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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Roush, Chris
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Record #:
6848
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In the early 1990s, Gary Bryant owned a Hickory Hams shop. With sandwich sales outdistancing packaged hams, he saw a need for an upscale sandwich shop. He sold his business and opened the first Bear Rock Cafe in Greensboro in 1997. Today there are twenty-nine restaurants in nine states, including sixteen in North Carolina. The restaurants feature a mountain lodge décor and a varied menu of salads and sandwiches. Revenues in 2003 were $16 million.
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6949
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Tim Rice began his medical career in 1978 as a pharmacist at Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro. He held various position there, including three years as chief operating officer, before being named president and CEO of the five-hospital system in 2004. Moses H. Cone Hospital employs over 7,000, making it Greensboro's largest private employer.
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6951
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The 2003-2004 National Hockey League season is on hold because the owners have locked the players out over a salary dispute. North Carolina's team, the Carolina Hurricanes, have yet to play a game. Roush discusses how the dispute affects not only the team but also local businesses, like hotels, caterers, restaurants, malls, and memorabilia stores, that depend on home games for part of their yearly revenues.
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Record #:
6984
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Susan Devore is president of Charlotte-based Premier Purchasing Partners LP. The company helps over 1,500 hospitals around the country cut costs by buying supplies in bulk. Each year she oversees the purchase of over $19 billion in medical equipment and other supplies. Because of her work, MODERN HEALTHCARE magazine named her the 67th most powerful person in health care, ahead of the U.S. Surgeon General.
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Record #:
6980
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Some North Carolina cities consider soccer tournaments as an income source. The state has become a prime location for some of the biggest college tournaments, including the 2004 women's Final Four in Cary. Many youth leagues and high school conferences exist across the state. Cities see tournaments as a way to fill hotel rooms, pack restaurants, and attract shoppers.
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Record #:
6985
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Real estate mogul Steven Bell is profiled in this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA article. Bell presides over Greensboro-based Steven D. Bell & Co. which owns and manages two dozen shopping centers and other commercial properties, eighteen thousand apartments, and eleven retirement homes in eight states. The company is worth around $1.7 billion and employs 675.
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Record #:
6982
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Charles Peters, the new chief financial officer of Raleigh-based Red Hat, Inc., is profiled. He was chief financial officer for Burlington Industries before assuming his present position. Red Hat sells and services the Linux computer-operating system.
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Record #:
7096
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In the Atlantic Coast Conference, intercollegiate sports teams bring nationwide attention to the member universities and revenues to fund programs. Roush discusses a secondary source of revenues from sports-–royalties from items sold with college logos. Revenues from this source vary from year to year, fluctuating with the successes or failures of the conference teams.
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Record #:
7206
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At colleges and universities, only football and men's basketball are considered revenue-producing sports. Nonrevenue sports, such as baseball, softball, track and field, soccer, lacrosse, and wrestling, usually generate very little money for athletic department coffers. Roush discusses approaches schools in North Carolina and elsewhere are taking to increase revenues from these sports.
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Record #:
7281
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Pinehurst hosted the 1999 U.S. Open Golfing Championship, and the tournament returned in June 2005 to play on Pinehurst Resort's No. 2 course. Roush discusses the five-year planning that goes into hosting a golf tournament and how the 2005 event compared with the 1999 one.
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Record #:
7298
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Richard Bryant, co-founder with Bobby Edgerton of Raleigh's Capital Investments, became the first chairman of the North Carolina Securities Industry Association in February 2004. The new trade association has twenty members who work for companies such as BB&T Investments and Central Carolina Bank. The non-profit association will provide networking opportunities for securities dealers, promote North Carolina's securities industry and lobby legislators.
Record #:
7428
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A strike canceled the hockey season for 2004-2005, and a settlement was finally reached in July 2005. When professional sports teams go on strike, a drop in fan attendance is typical for the following season. Raleigh's National Hockey League team, the Carolina Hurricanes, hope the fans haven't forgotten them. Roush discusses some things owners are planning to attract fans. Hockey fans say putting a competitive Hurricane team on the ice will bring them back.
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Record #:
7500
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HFN, a trade publication, ranks Nancy Webster the third-most-powerful person in home fashion and design, behind French designer Philippe Stark and Martha Stewart. For the past two years, Webster headed Target's design team. In September 2005, she became CEO of Thomasville Furniture and the first woman to run a large furniture maker.
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Record #:
24224
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Ken Lewis is the CEO of Bank of America Corp. and decided to have his salary based on the company's performance. Though this seems like an altruistic move, the CEO still got paid millions of dollars and would be allowed to collect a hefty severance pay if he got fired. The author argues CEOs still get paid like lords when their shareholders suffer like serfs.
Record #:
24220
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In 2002, nearly 20,000 North Carolinians in high tech jobs were unemployed as jobs such as programming were moved overseas for cheaper labor.