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Record #:
21424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Throughout his career in public service, William Woods Holden was a very controversial figure. During his tenure as governor of North Carolina, Holden angered the opposition by his response and actions against the violence of the Ku Klux Klan, the violation of political rights in the Piedmont region, and by several reckless political situations. In 1870, the General Assembly impeached Holden and convicted him of violating the civil liberties of certain citizens. This ruling barred him from ever holding public office again and he spent the rest of his life unsuccessfully attempting to repeal his disbarment and impeachment.
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Record #:
21481
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the first years of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln believed he could quickly end the war, restore the Union, and reorganize Southern governments. Between 1861 and 1863, Lincoln believed he could restrain Republican antislavery sentiment and rely on Southern Unionism to end the war. While inadequately studied by current historians, Lincoln's controversial and failed reconstruction plan for North Carolina in 1862-1863 demonstrated that he no longer believed a quick restoration of order in the South was likely.
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Record #:
16158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor William Woods Holden represented the head of a new political movement in the state following the Civil War, the Republican Party. During this point in history, republicans were concerned with protecting newly freed African-American liberties. Holden would be removed from office by a Democratic impeachment after he took action against members of the Klan.
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Record #:
4892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the South's defeat at Gettysburg, Raleigh newspaperman William Woods Holden urged negotiations with the North to bring peace. His peace movement put him at odds with many people, including his old friend Zebulon Vance, who defeated Holden for governor in 1864. North Carolina was the only state that had a peace movement. Confederate troops even sacked Holden's offices and threatened his life. After the war Holden became governor in 1868, but his support of African-American rights and opposition to the Ku Klux Klan led to his impeachment. He was removed from office in 1871, the first U.S. governor to endure this fate.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p24-27, il, por