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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 5, May 2005
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Record #:
7197
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The approximately 160,000 acres of the Croatan National Forest lie in parts of Carteret, Craven, and Jones Counties. The forest has a rich variety of wildlife and plant species that can be observed from trails such as the Neusiok or the Pine Cliffs along the Neuse River. As part of the Croatan Game Land, hunters will find wild turkeys, deer, and black bears. Some of the best blackwater fishing in North Carolina is found in the waterways. Camping facilities ranges from primitive sites to those with electricity.
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Record #:
7195
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Most of the world's wild Venus's flytraps are located within a seventy-five-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. There the flytraps find the necessary ingredients for survival -- damp, acidic soils in open-canopy forests or on the edges of pocosins. Of the more than 450 carnivorous plants in the world, North Carolina's flytrap has the distinction of being the first to be recognized by science for its ability to capture insects. Colonial governor Arthur Dobbs wrote about the plant in 1760. Other writers on the plant have included Charles Darwin and botanist B.W. Wells.
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Record #:
7198
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In Brevard, white squirrels make up about 25 percent of the total squirrel population. The animals have been protected by law within the city limits since 1986. The squirrels are not albinos; they have a gray patch on their heads, a gray dorsal stripe, and dark eyes. The squirrels exist in a number of towns east of the Mississippi. Brevard celebrates an annual White Squirrel Festival, and the local White Squirrel Shoppe sells white squirrel products, including mugs, candles, and ornaments.
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Record #:
7196
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Of North Carolina's forty freshwater fishing records, ten were set over twenty-five years ago. These include the bluegill at four pounds, five ounces; American (white) shad at seven pounds, fifteen and one-half ounces; and the channel catfish at forty pounds, eight ounces. Scott Van Horn, head of the North Carolina Division of Inland Fisheries' Habitat Conservation Program, discusses why these forty records have stood the test of time.
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