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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 65 Issue 7, July 2001
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Record #:
5080
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most people think of the Southwest when they heard the words \"Texas horned lizard,\" sometimes called \"horned toad.\" Once kept as pets, these creatures either escaped or were released in a variety of places nationwide. The species was first reported in North Carolina in 1880; however, no colony was documented until 1989, when a thriving one was found in Onslow County near Swansboro. The Texas horned lizard is the only reptile species successfully introduced into the state.
Record #:
5081
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina mountains provide habitats to wildlife found nowhere else in the state. This wildlife includes the Appalachian cottontail, Carolina northern flying squirrel, brook trout, Virginia big-eared bat, and hellbender. While none of these species are endangered at the moment, air pollution and encroaching development are among threats they face.
Record #:
5079
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to a colorful array of butterflies of all shapes and sizes, with habitats stretching from the Appalachian Mountains to the Coastal Plains wetlands. Over 160 species have been documented. Of these only Saint Francis satyr is listed as an endangered species. With a little time and patience people can learn there are more butterfly colors beyond the familiar orange and black of the Monarch.
Subject(s):
Record #:
5078
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sid Baynes has retired from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission after 31 years of service. Baynes, a North Carolina State University graduate, began his career as a wildlife biologist. In 1976, he was named chief of the Division of Conservation Education.
Record #:
5077
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina commercial fishermen experienced their second-lowest catch in 27 years, with landings of 154.1 million pounds of fish and shellfish in 2000. However, their market value was the third largest on record at $108.3 million. The top five harvested species were Atlantic menhaden, blue crabs (hard), shrimp, Atlantic croaker, and spiny dogfish shark