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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 62 Issue 6, June 1998
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Record #:
3689
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With approximately 9,000 black bears living in 55 western and eastern counties, encounters with people are inevitable. Precautions, including covering garbage containers, the use of electric fences around livestock, and cleaning up campsites, will help minimize this.
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Record #:
3691
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The growth of coastal development threatens colonies of birds by disrupting their nesting. In 1979, the National Audubon Society created the North Carolina Coastal Island Sanctuary. Today, nineteen mostly man-made islands stretch from Cape Hatteras to Cape Fear, providing havens for birds.
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Record #:
3785
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The 1998 state waterfowl stamps and print feature Canadian geese and the historic Currituck Shooting Club in Corolla. Money from sales supports the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Waterfowl Fund.
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Record #:
3690
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Ask a person to name a tree representative of the South and they will probably answer, \"magnolia.\" In this pictorial essay, Melissa McGaw follows a spring bud through blossoming to fall's demise.
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Record #:
3856
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Abstract:
Twenty-seven species of crayfish with colors from drab brown to bright red live in the state's marshes, streams, and other wet areas. They are both predator and preyed upon and are a fascinating creature to biologists and small boys.
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