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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 47 Issue 6, June 1983
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Record #:
7950
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Abstract:
Since 1976, North Carolina has required hunters to report their big game harvest. Game managers use this information to make decisions affecting hunting seasons, bag limits, and other regulatory matters. Report Number 7 covers the 1982-1983 hunting season and lists statistics by counties for game harvests of black bear, white-tailed deer, wild boar, and wild turkey.
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Record #:
9724
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Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling is remembered today as one of this country's great conservationists. He was instrumental in founding the National Wildlife Federation, established the national wildlife refuge system, and made the federal “duck stamp” a reality. He was also an accomplished political cartoonist. Taylor discusses some of his biting cartoons and their influence on conservation.
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Record #:
9723
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In North Carolina, pitcher plants grow mostly in the coastal plain. Earley describes this elegant plant that has an appetite for insects.
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Record #:
9726
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Beginning in the 1940s, widespread use of DDT and other pesticides had a disastrous effect on wildfowl reproduction. In North Carolina eagles were wiped out and ospreys all but exterminated. Lake Ellis and Orton Pond were two osprey sites which escaped serious infestation of pesticides. While osprey populations are again on the rise, severe weather, predators, and habitat destruction can limit the survival of a number of fledglings.
Record #:
9725
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Abstract:
Brunswick County's Green Swamp is a 140-square-mile haven for plants and wildlife. All fourteen of the state's carnivorous plants live there. The area lay untouched for centuries until 1907 when the Waccamaw Lumber Company began logging operations. In 1974, the Department of the Interior designated 24,800 acres as a National Natural Landmark.
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Record #:
14014
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission selected a painting of a drake and hen mallard as the design for the first stamp in the state's waterfowl stamp and print program. Richard Plasschaert, a well-known wildlife artist from Minnesota, painted the picture.