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9 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980
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Record #:
8782
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Abstract:
Born in 1782, Adam Springs attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he was one of the first seven graduates. He and his wife lived in Gaston County where they employed a girl to wash and iron his clothes. Her name was Nancy Hanks, and it is rumored her son, Abraham Lincoln, was the son of Adam Springs. Springs spent a great deal of time fish trapping on his property, and he was buried at the gravesite on his land, supposedly upside down, to keep an eye over the fish traps. For years, visitors insisted the gravesite was haunted, and ghost hunters today still go there searching for ghosts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p18-20, il, por
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Record #:
8783
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Dr. John Carr Monk converted to Catholicism and founded St. Mark's Church in Newton Grove in 1871. Concerned with the salvation of the souls of newly freed slaves, Monk asked Father Mark S. Gross of Wilmington to visit. Gross visited Newton Grove once a month and baptized large groups of converts, both black and white. The church structure itself was not built until 1874, and Mass was held in Dr. Monk's house until that time. Monk died in 1877 and was buried behind the church. St. Mark's was renamed Our Lady of Guadalupe in 1958 following integration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p23-25, il, f
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Record #:
8781
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The Alexander Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, based in Taylorsville, restores and runs train cars. One train, nicknamed the June Bug, is taken by the group all over the country, from New Orleans to Disney World to Boston. In September, the chapter will host a run open to the public using the Skyland Steam Special, another of its trains, from Hickory to Asheville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p14-15, il
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Record #:
8784
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This is the second half of Lieutenant George C. Rounds' first-hand account of being in Raleigh in 1865. This part recounts the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the end of the war. Rounds sent a message from the top of the Capitol builging announcing the end of the war. The message read P-E-A-C-E.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p26-28, il
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Record #:
8780
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In 1796, the first Cape Fear Lighthouse was completed. Because of the extensive shoals, the tower was built four miles inland. As a result of its location, it was effectively useless to sailors, and was replaced by a new tower in 1818. The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, built in 1802, also proved ineffective. Lighthouses are no longer built today. In their stead are skeleton towers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p7-10, il
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Record #:
24479
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Though their role is no longer what it used to be, historic coastal lighthouses are still an important part of the state’s history and tourism industry. This article discusses the status of the various lighthouses, including the ones that are still active and those that may be in danger of falling.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p7-10, il
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Record #:
24480
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Abstract:
The June Bug rail line travels from Taylorsville to Statesville and brings many tourists who wish to experience travel in an older fashion. This article presents what it is like to spend a day on the June Bug.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p14-15, il
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Record #:
24482
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Dr. John Carr Monk (1827-1877) created a stronghold of Catholicism in the Bible Belt by establishing a church in 1871 in Newton Grove, North Carolina. Today, this church is known as Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p23-25, il
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Record #:
24481
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This article presents the life and accomplishments of Adam Springs (1782-1840), a man buried in 1840 in today’s McAdenville, North Carolina. Locals claim he still haunts the South Fork River bank.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p18-20, il, por
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