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Record #:
18459
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leo Haid was a great leader not only in religious work, but he was also a leader in education, civic affairs, and business. In 1885, he was elected abbot of Maryhelp Abbey, later Belmont, in Gaston County. Over the next seven years he added new buildings, 200 acres, and increased the number of clergy, staff, and students. In 1889, Pope Pius X consecrated him Bishop of Messene and Vicar Apostolic of North Carolina. He is buried in the monastic cemetery at Belmont.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 31, Jan 1942, p6, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
21710
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vincent Waters, Bishop of Raleigh, worked tirelessly between 1945 and 1974 to improve the lives of Catholic African-Americans throughout North Carolina. He attempted to integrate parishes and schools under his jurisdiction, ordain black priests, and was a leader of the state's civil rights struggles.
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Record #:
24482
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. John Carr Monk (1827-1877) created a stronghold of Catholicism in the Bible Belt by establishing a church in 1871 in Newton Grove, North Carolina. Today, this church is known as Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p23-25, il
Full Text:
Record #:
37098
Abstract:
This explanation focused on Communion’s Catholic origin and modern variations of the rite also practiced in many Protestant denominations. Fleshing out the explanation were the presence or absence of wine, practices such as intincting, and how the elements represented the blood and body of Jesus Christ.
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Record #:
36180
Author(s):
Abstract:
Answering this question entailed examining the Ancient Christian and pagan origins for a holiday. Noted were the pagan violent roots tamed or Christian influences eliminated through modern day commercialism. From this came the answer: modern day Christians should celebrate the holiday as ancient Christians would have them do.