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7 results for The State Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980
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Record #:
9312
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Abstract:
Ulricksburgh, a 36-square mile city chartered by North Carolina legislature in 1748, was the largest city thus far in the country. Founded by Ulrick Crowder, the city was lost or misplaced until 1967 when Alan Stout found a copy of Crowder's land grant and pieced together what happened to the man and his land.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p10-12, il, map
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Record #:
9315
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Douglas Ferguson, world-renowned potter and owner of Pigeon Forge Pottery, created and donated a mural called “Heritage” to his alma mater, Mars Hill College. The work is now valued at over $125,000. Ferguson used memories of his childhood to construct the mural as a way for current students to appreciate the work and consider it their own.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
9314
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Although the science of photography was only twenty years old at the onset of the Civil War, the making of tintypes was prevalent. Less expensive than regular photography, tintypes were an easy way for men to send their portraits home and to carry the portraits of loved ones with them.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p17, 39, il, por
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Record #:
9313
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North Carolina barbeque is made of pork while Texas barbeque is made a beef, a difference marked by what sort of livestock is raised in each area. Another difference is North Carolina uses a vinegar based sauce while Texas prefers tomato.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p13-15, il
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Record #:
9316
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In February 1813, the Virginia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church met in New Bern. One of the speakers, Reverend Jesse Lee of Virginia, spoke of how the world had been turned upside down after the fall in the Garden of Eden. The next day, much to everyone's enjoyment, it was discovered that local pranksters had gone through the town and turned everything upside down from mailboxes and street signs to boats and wagons.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p23, il
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Record #:
9318
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Hoover carts appeared in North Carolina in the early 1930s during the Depression. When a family's Ford or Chevrolet broke and they could not afford to fix it, the car was converted into a two-wheeled cart led by a mule or horse.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p26
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Record #:
9317
Abstract:
Paul Green, native of Harnett County and Pulitzer Prize winner, turned eighty-five on March 17, 1979. To honor him, his assistant, Rhoda Wynn, gave him a quilt made of nine squares. Each square was made by a person connected with the dramas Green has written. The quilt hangs in Green's home library.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p24-26, il
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