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11 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961
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Record #:
11875
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Abstract:
Bugs Barringer recounts tales of his father, Osmond Barringer of Charlotte, North Carolina, who was a true innovator. Among the stories recounted in print, Osmond was responsible for the first X-ray ever made at Davidson College. In addition, Osmond was fond of automobiles, buying from the first load of steam \"Locomobiles\" delivered in the South, and proceeded to set several speed records in his vehicles.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p7, 48, por
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Record #:
11876
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Abstract:
At the end of 1776, Bethabara and Bethania housed a large portion of the Moravian brethren, with Salem set to stand as the new community by 1773. The new town became the center of the Wachovia settlement, attracting professional men such as a doctor, apothecary, and surveyor. Salem soon became a craft and manufacturing center, offering a full slate of services including weaving, tanning, and distilling. Salem was founded on the Moravian principle of oecononie, whereby the means of production were owned by the community, and the goods they produced were shared in kind
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p8
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Record #:
11877
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A hardy race of North Carolinians, the Guthrey, Moore, Willis, and Rose families carved a living from Shackelford Banks, scavenging the shores, harvesting oysters and clams, and whale fishing. The historical account is narrated by Stacey Guthrey, daughter of whale-boat builder Devin Guthrey.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p9, 27, il
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Record #:
12057
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Abstract:
Possibly the only survivor of Edward Moseley's vast private library, a lone volume entitled \"Treatise of Husbandry and Gardening\" is housed in the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina Library. Edward Moseley's original collection contained seventy-four books, the majority in Greek or Latin, all of a type that appealed to those of a higher education. The solitary book of this early book collector came to the North Carolina Collection through the Stephen B. Weeks Collection of Caroliniana purchased in 1918 by a special appropriation of the Board of Trustees of the University.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p11, il
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Record #:
12058
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Abstract:
Seventy years ago, author Theo. B. Davis was a small child who helped his father clear the land around their large home in Graham County. Life was the pioneer sort, and few neighbors lived within \"hollering\" distance. Few schools were found, and both food and clothing were homegrown and homemade. Logging was the first cash-producing industry of the county, and still ranks as number one.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p23, 36, por
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Record #:
12653
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Fontana Resort, modern by most standards, is the third resort on the site and its history extends back before the turn of the century. Capital of the lumber empire in the 1890s, a railway transformed it into a boom town, later boasting a profitable copper mine, and a large dam. The second Fontana village was built to house construction workers for the TVA dam, and was eventually abandoned. It has now been rebuilt, modernized, and expanded to become one of the state's largest vacation facilities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p31-32, il, por
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Record #:
12652
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two giant dam projects are creating a new future for the Catawba and Yadkin rivers in Western North Carolina. Financed by Duke Power Company, a huge hydroelectric plant is under construction on the highly-developed Catawba River, creating the biggest lake in the State, Lake Norman. The Army Corps of Engineers is co-partnering with the town of Winston-Salem to construct a dam that will harness the Yadkin River.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p41, 43, il
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Record #:
12655
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Graham, the last land wrested from Indians and settled by white men, is considered North Carolina's last frontier. Located next to the Tennessee border, most of the area is still forest, some areas still possessing virgin timber. A helpful travel guide illustrates the abundant resources and history of Graham County, including waterways, forests, and game.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p12-14, 24-27, il, por, map
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Record #:
12661
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the end of 1776, Bethabara and Bethania housed a large portion of the Moravian brethren, with Salem set to stand as the new community by 1773. The new town became the center of the Wachovia settlement, attracting professional men such as a doctor, apothecary, and surveyor. Salem soon became a craft and manufacturing center, offering a full slate of services including weaving, tanning, and distilling. Salem was founded on the Moravian principle of oecononie, whereby the means of production were owned by the community, and the goods they produced were shared in kind.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p8-9, 27
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Record #:
12663
Author(s):
Abstract:
Living on scattered tracts of the Cherokee Band, 247 Indians took refuge in the Smoky Mountains after white chief and benefactor, Colonel W. H. Thomas, bought property for the Cherokees. The land purchase was not contiguous; other tracts are located in the Qualla boundary in Swain and Jackson Counties, as well as tribal lands in Cherokee and Graham Counties. In Graham, the Snowbird Indians have lived on these tribal lands for centuries, the most noted of them a chief named Junaluska.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p15, 30, por
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Record #:
12657
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Abstract:
Graham is the only county in North Carolina without a single Negro citizen, and has only ever cited the existence of one Negro family who left the county in 1902. Court records indicate the presence of Negroes working in Graham, with only two court cases involving civil action. Aside from a lack of Negro residents, Graham County is known for the highest dam in the east, the Fontana Dam, at 480 feet in height.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p16-19, il, por
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