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8 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005
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Record #:
7351
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Abstract:
Samuel Spencer, a Georgia native, was the first president of the Southern Railway and one of the country's railroad leaders. Founded in 1894, the Southern Railway Company controlled over 4,500 miles of track across the South. To keep the equipment repaired, the company built a large repair shop in Rowan County in 1896 and named the location Spencer. It is the only one of North Carolina's railroad towns named for a railroad man. Turner discusses three decisions Spencer made in early life and how they affected North Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p30-33, il, por
Record #:
7350
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Abstract:
The State Highway Commission, forerunner of the North Carolina Department of Transportation, began naming state roads and bridges in 1917. Over four hundred highways, bridges, ferries, and other structures have been given honorary names. The list grows by fifteen to twenty names a year. The state list does not include the thousands of secondary roads and city streets that city councils and boards of commissioners have the authority to name. Bishop discusses what the NCDOT requires to consider a naming request and provides examples of what has been named.
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Record #:
7345
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Abstract:
Because of the work of Dr. William S. Powell, professor of history at UNC-CH, and local historians, North Carolina possesses one of the most comprehensive gazetteers of any state in the nation. Titled THE NORTH CAROLINA GAZETTEER: A DICTIONARY OF TAR HEEL PLACES, the reference book records when the state's places were founded, when their names were first used, and how the place-names came into existence.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
7349
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mewborn discusses the role Dr. Cartwright played in forming the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association in 1953. Dr. Cartwright was a professor at Duke University from 1951 to 1980. Previously he had served as the historian for the Military District of Washington during World War II and taught history and education at Boston University. He had been involved with a junior historian program in Minnesota.
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Record #:
7347
Author(s):
Abstract:
King Charles II of England in 1663 granted land in America to eight noblemen who had helped him regain the throne. The land was later named Carolina. Poteat discusses how the arriving colonists chose names for the places they encountered. For example, sometimes the Native American place-names were retained; towns and counties were named after a well-known persons associated with the colony; and often the name of the local Native American tribes was used.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p8-13, por, map
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Record #:
7352
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Abstract:
Where the Deep and Haw rivers join to form the Cape Fear River, the town of Haywood once stood. Established in 1796, the town was named for John Haywood, who served as the state treasurer of North Carolina from 1787 to 1827. Haywood was proposed as the permanent home of the state capital, and in 1792, it was proposed as the home for the University of North Carolina. Daniels recounts the history of the town from its founding in 1796 to its demise in the20th-century.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p34-36, por, map
Record #:
7346
Author(s):
Abstract:
How do schools get their names? Crissman provides a number of possibilities for names, including a person (Booker T. Washington Elementary); a place (Beech Mountain Elementary); a direction (Northwest High School); and a lofty idea (First Flight Elementary). Every North Carolina school system has a policy for naming its schools.
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Record #:
7348
Author(s):
Abstract:
Koonts discusses the interesting connection between Arthur Dobbs, the royal governor of North Carolina; James Glasgow, the first North Carolina secretary of state; and General Nathaniel Greene, the Revolutionary War hero. Present-day Greene County at one time bore the name of each man. Koonts discusses how the name changes occurred.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p14-17, il, por, map
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