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Record #:
8050
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Abstract:
There are over 1,430 highway historical markers in North Carolina. The state's newest marker is located south of Tarboro on Hwy 33. It was unveiled in July 2006, on the 70th anniversary of the founding of the state's first electric cooperative, Edgecombe-Martin County Electric Membership Cooperation, and recognizes the place where an electric cooperative first brought power to rural North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 9, Sept 2006, p10, il
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Record #:
8519
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Abstract:
North Carolina's Highway Historical Marker Program, which celebrated its seventieth anniversary in 2006, is one of the oldest and most respected of its kind in the country. There are markers in all one hundred counties, over 1,440 currently. Gery describes twenty-eight markers that highlight the important role rural people and places have had in the state's history.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p11-13, il, map
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Record #:
15765
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Four miles north-east of Morganton a highway historical marker was erected to mark the site of Fort San Juan. The fort was a 16th century Spanish outpost named after Captain Juan Pardo who, with a 125 conquistadors, trekked from Florida north to an Indian village called Joara. Pardo's fortification and garrison of 30 soldiers survived eighteen months before being destroyed by its neighbors.
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Record #:
15890
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The General Assembly approved $5,000 a year for two years to begin installation of historical highway markers along the state's roads. The program will begin with twenty-two markers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 42, Mar 1936, p4
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Record #:
26930
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Abstract:
Fletcher, North Carolina is home to Calvary Episcopal Church, where the “Westminster Abbey of the South” is located. Beginning in 1924, Rector Clarence Stuart McClellan Jr.—with help from the Daughters of the Confederacy—erected 18 granite boulders with bronze dedication markers near the church. Those honored included Jefferson Davis, Stephen Foster, Dan Emmett, and others.
Record #:
7350
Author(s):
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The State Highway Commission, forerunner of the North Carolina Department of Transportation, began naming state roads and bridges in 1917. Over four hundred highways, bridges, ferries, and other structures have been given honorary names. The list grows by fifteen to twenty names a year. The state list does not include the thousands of secondary roads and city streets that city councils and boards of commissioners have the authority to name. Bishop discusses what the NCDOT requires to consider a naming request and provides examples of what has been named.
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Record #:
30553
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Started in 1935, the North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program was based on a similar program in VA. After forty tears, cuts to the funding of the project could threaten the quality and effectiveness of the program.
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Record #:
30759
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In 1935, the NC General Assembly authorized the NC Highway Historical Marker Program, modeled after a similar program in Virginia. The state’s first marker was dedicated in 1936 in Granville County for the home site of John Penn, one of NC’s three signers of the Declaration of Independence. In its fiftieth year, the program boasts nearly 1,250 markers around the state.
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