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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Poteat, RaeLana
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Record #:
16197
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1892, the Populist and Republican parties joined to oppose the firmly rooted Democratic Party. This merger forced many Democrats from office and, in the 1898 election, the white supremacy Democratic platform led to a violent mob in Wilmington.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 41 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p26-29, il
Record #:
19612
Author(s):
Abstract:
This issue of the Tar Heel Junior Historian seeks to give readers a good overview of the state's history though a listing of items from A to Z; for example, B is for barbecue, H for Halifax Resolves and hurricanes, P for pottery tradition, and W for waterfalls.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Spring 2013, p1-36, il, por
Record #:
4890
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1862, Union troops occupied much of eastern North Carolina north of the Cape Fear River, and over 10,000 escaping slaves crossed their lines to freedom by spring. Many of the freed slaves joined the four North Carolina African American Union regiments. Others worked for the Army as teamsters, scouts, spies, cooks, and laundresses. When the war ended, the Freedman's Bureau replaced the Army as provider of care, welfare, and education to former slaves.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p15-17, il
Record #:
7347
Author(s):
Abstract:
King Charles II of England in 1663 granted land in America to eight noblemen who had helped him regain the throne. The land was later named Carolina. Poteat discusses how the arriving colonists chose names for the places they encountered. For example, sometimes the Native American place-names were retained; towns and counties were named after a well-known persons associated with the colony; and often the name of the local Native American tribes was used.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p8-13, por, map
Subject(s):