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5 results for White Supremacy Campaign--Wilmington Race Riot, 1898
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Record #:
1503
Abstract:
Steelman recounts the story of the 1898 Wilmington race riot, including a sketch of the history of prior race relations in the city and a discussion of the story's tangled historiography.
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Record #:
15922
Author(s):
Abstract:
For two days political discord led to an outbreak of violence within the state's largest city, Wilmington, in 1898. Democrats' white-supremacy was challenged by \"fusionists\" or a Populist-Republican alliance, especially in the racially charged city of Wilmington where the African American population outnumbered Wilmington. Between November 10-12 violence overtook the city and was not squelched until members of the State Guard and U.S. Navy calmed rioters.
Record #:
16197
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1892, the Populist and Republican parties joined to oppose the firmly rooted Democratic Party. This merger forced many Democrats from office and, in the 1898 election, the white supremacy Democratic platform led to a violent mob in Wilmington.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 41 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p26-29, il
Record #:
21119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Chesnutt's second novel, The Marrow of Tradition, published in 1901, is a fictional account of the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot. Chesnutt hoped that through his writing, he could enlighten other Americans, especially non-Southerners, to the problem of race plaguing America.
Record #:
21116
Abstract:
The 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, a low point in African-Americans' treatment after the Civil War, is generally recognized as the onset of the Jim Crow era in North Carolina. This narrative conveys the events leading up to, during, and after the riots.
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