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6 results for Sea Chest Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975
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Record #:
7533
Abstract:
In the 1920s, Midgett's father, James O. Casey, was assigned as lighthouse keeper at the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. She recounts her experiences during the several years she and her family lived there.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p49-52, il
Record #:
7561
Abstract:
In this SEA CHEST interview, Lloyd Styron talks about the early days of blue marlin sportfishing in Outer Banks' waters. The first time anyone fished for blue marlin off the Outer Banks was in 1933, and the second time was in 1936. Styron describes the people who came to fish, the boats and equipment they used for fishing, the size of the marlins they caught, and his experiences accompanying them.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p9-18, il
Record #:
7562
Abstract:
Austin has been building boats since he was a young man. He has his own methods for building boats; he has never used any special plans, and he follows his own instinct when building. He uses three tools when building boats in his shop: a dewalt, joiner, and a planer. Austin can build two fourteen-footers a week.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p60-63, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
35961
Abstract:
Vats that kept horses and cattle clean and tick free were first provided during the Great Depression. Stories that attested to the importance of the vats came from Buxton natives attesting to vats in towns like Waves, Avon, and Rodanthe. Buxton. Included were descriptions of the vats and pictures of vats in Avon.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p53-57
Record #:
35962
Author(s):
Abstract:
This Cape Hatteras’ journal edition provided by the Sea Chest staff, covering September 1876, offered a surface impression of days not worth writing home about. Details consisted of barometric pressure, rainfall amounts, telegraph lines repairs, and mild illnesses among the staff. Of historical note, though, may be the photocopied image of September 17th’s handwritten entry.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p67-69
Record #:
35960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted details for the tallest lighthouse in America were a drawing of the original lighthouse, the mid nineteenth century renovation that yielded installation of the Fresnel Lens, and its role in the Civil War.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p46-47