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16 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005
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Record #:
7255
Abstract:
Edenton, in Chowan County, has historic buildings spanning three centuries and representing many styles of architecture. Named for Gov. Charles Eden, the town served as the colonial capital until the mid-1740s. It was home to Penelope Barker, organizer of Edenton Tea Party in 1774. The town's restoration began in the early 20th-century. Current preservation activities include an overhaul of the Edenton Cotton Mill. Of the 70 remaining mill houses, 57 have been purchased by families for restoration, and the 1899 mill building is being converted into 30 condominiums.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7258
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People associate golf with town of Pinehurst; however, there was more than one game in town. In 1895, the first resort guests played tennis. The resort's founder, James Walker Tufts, preferred to play roque, a game akin to croquet. Other activities included lawn bowls, badminton, table tennis, polo matches, harness races, steeplechases, archery, fox hunting, and skeet shooting. Legendary sharpshooter Annie Oakley lived at The Carolina Hotel from 1916 to 1922. She gave shooting exhibitions and taught approximately 15,000 men and women how to shoot.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p80-82, 84-85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7256
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For over a year, Madison County's Mountain Park Hotel served as a makeshift compound for World War I German prisoners of war. None had actually fought against the United States; they were civilians who had worked on German and Austrian merchant ships and were interned as “enemy aliens” when the United States entered the war on April 6, 1917. Hodge describes the internees' year at Hot Springs.
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Record #:
7257
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Toymaker Harold Garrison hand-carves old-time toys, like the hillbilly yo-yo and the gee haw whimmy diddle. Garrison is in his eighty-second year, stands 6'10,” and still lives at his old homeplace in Weaverville. His carving titled “Government Machines” earned him a spot in the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p74-77, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7254
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Three bed and breakfast inns with an international flair roll out the welcome mat, providing European hospitality on North Carolina soil. The Gaesthaus Salzburg, Linne ‘Ardan, and the Grafton Lodge and Cabins are all located in Lake Lure.
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Record #:
7262
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In 1997, Pete Bock and Jerry Pettit launched the Coastal Plain League with six teams in Eastern North Carolina. The summer league ranks as one of the country's best for college players, professional baseball scouts, and fans. In 2005, the league totals fourteen teams that play a fifty-six game schedule. The league revived a number of the state's historic ballparks formerly used by minor league teams. Although the players are amateurs, the teams operate just like minor league baseball teams, selling billboard advertising, food and drinks, and offering the usual promotions fans are accustomed to at minor league parks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p104,106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7264
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James Emory Gibson of High Point is one of North Carolina's greatest success stories. In 1931, in debt $75,000 during the Depression and with a family of six to provide for, Gibson parleyed a 10-cent paddleball game into a company that would sell in 1972 for $1.6 million. He repaid the debt. The game was Fli-Back, a game that challenged players to continuously bounce a sponge-ball that was attached to a small wooden paddle with an elastic string.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p126-128, 130, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7265
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When members of the New York Knickerbockers baseball team marched off to fight in the Civil War, they took the game and rules with them and played during their time in camps. James Constantine, a divinity student at Duke University, now serves as chaplain of the 26th Regiment of North Carolina Troops Reactivated. He wants to develop a vintage baseball team that will play the game as Civil War soldiers played it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p110, 112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7267
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Colored-pencil artist Kim Mosher, a resident of the Hatteras Island town of Buxton since 1987, draws her inspiration from the air and water that surrounds her island home. What she sees finds its way onto paper, tiles, and fabrics in vivid eye-catching colors. Many of her limited edition prints find an extended life on note cards, serving trays, decorative tables, and clothing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p150-154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7263
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Railroading attracts many tourists to Bryson City. They come to ride on the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad and to tour the Smoky Mountain Trains Museum. The museum, operated by Tim and Sue Cooper, boasts the largest collection of Lionel trains in the Carolinas, with over 7,000 cars and locomotives on display. Between 250 and 300 new pieces are added yearly. The collection is valued at $1.2 million.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p120-122, 124-125, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7259
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Among the Cherokees and other tribes, the game of stickball has been for generations part ceremony, part organized combat, and a true test of athletic skill. Native Americans count it as one of their favorite and most revered recreational activities. The game brought tribes together for a competitive game of skill and strategy. Hodge discusses the pre-game ceremonies and how the Cherokees played the game.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p94-96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7266
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The Raleigh Trolley tour started as part of the city's bicentennial festivities. The tours proved so popular that the city, together with Capital Area Preservation, continued the runs. Today, the trolley makes four trips every Saturday, leaving from Mordecai Park. Bloom discusses what can be seen and learned from a Raleigh Trolley.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7261
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History credits French peasants with the origin of croquet. In 1865, the game officially came to America with the establishment of the Newport Croquet Club in Rhode Island. Its popularity soon spread around the country. In 1987, the Bald Head Island Croquet Club organized. With eighty members, the club is one of the largest in the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p88-90, 92-93, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7260
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The North Carolina Baseball Museum, located at Fleming Stadium in Wilson, opened February 2, 2004. The collection is devoted solely to the state's baseball history, which dates back to the 19th-century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7269
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Dr. George Pilkington built the first drugstore in Pittsboro in 1916. The store passed through several owners. A local family gutted and modernized the space for a furniture store in the 1960s. Pittsboro resident Gene Oldham bought as much of the surplus drugstore material as he could. In 1996, he purchased the building which housed Dr. Pilkington's store and, with the help of friends, set about recreating the look and feel of the early drugstores, using his purchases and parts scavenged from other defunct drugstores. The store's name, S&T's Soda Shoppe, comes from the initials of his sons' names, Steve and T. J.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p172-175, il Periodical Website
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