NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


14 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005
Currently viewing results 1 - 14
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7131
Author(s):
Abstract:
Swansboro in Onslow County is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. Visitors are attracted to the town by its sense of history, quiet atmosphere, restaurants, and unique shopping. Restored buildings of a century ago house many shops. A statue of the town's most famous citizen, Otway Burns, a privateer during the War of 1812, stands in the Bicentennial Park.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7132
Abstract:
Oesterreich describes three specialty shops that offer interesting alternatives to the usual purchase. They are the Tuba Exchange (Durham); the Silver Thimble Shop (Swansboro); and the Chicago Old Telephone Company (Sanford).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p36-41, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7136
Abstract:
North Carolina's governor's mansion in Raleigh was completed in 1891, but little money was given to creating a landscape. When Daniel G. Fowle, the first governor to occupy the mansion, visited the Biltmore Estate, George Vanderbilt asked him how the house was coming. Fowle replied that the grounds were hopeless. Vanderbilt then dispatched Gifford Pinchot to Raleigh to work on the gardens. Silcox-Jarrett traces the development of the mansion's landscaping from Pinchot's early work to the present.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p114-116, 118-119, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Few people can walk along a beach and not be attracted by the wide variety of seashells, which are the calcium carbonate homes for a large, diverse group of invertebrates called mollusks. Early civilizations used them for utensils and currency and to make dyes. Today people eat them, wear them as jewelry, and use them for road building. The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort houses one of the largest seashell collection in the country, the Watson Shell Collection.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p45-46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Television stations are busy workplaces. WRAL-TV5 in Raleigh is no exception. In 1958, the station's founder, A.J. Fletcher (1887-1979), started a three-quarter acre garden. Today the garden features seventy varieties of flowering and non-flowering plants, including ten hybrid azalea groups. Pittard discusses how this garden developed through the years and some of the ways it is used.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p144-148, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7141
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arboretum, located on the outskirts of Asheville, contains a unique garden called the Heritage Garden. The garden contains plants that the early Appalachian settlers used to create and enhance the necessities of life. Broomcorn was used by Indians, settlers, and now present-day artisans to make brooms. Marigolds, yarrow, and butterfly weed were sources for natural fabric dyeing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p152-155, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7135
Abstract:
North Carolina has one of the largest highway systems in the nation, with 79,000 miles of state-maintained roads. Only Texas with 80,000 has more. Each year along these roadways, from the mountains to the coast, the North Carolina Department of Transportation cultivates some 3,500 acres in wildflowers. Now in its 20 year, NCDOT the wildflower program is the largest in the nation.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p98-100, 102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7134
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Botanical Garden at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill celebrates the great diversity of the state's plant life. Starting with the Mercer Reeves Hubbard Herb Garden, which is located near the main entrance, Jackson takes the reader on a tour of the garden's plant collections.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p88-90, 92, 94, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marietta Gardens, located in Robeson County, grows over 5,000 varieties of daylilies. The twelve-acre farm, owned by John and Faye Shooter, is known here and abroad for its wide variety of quality daylilies and for the new varieties introduced by the owners. Plants sell from $50 to $250.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p130-135, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jackson describes three bed and breakfast inns that are known not only for their comfort and hospitality but also for their gardens and landscaping. They are the Big Mill Bed and Breakfast (Williamston); Fuquay Mineral Springs Inn and Garden (Fuquay-Varina); and the Van Landingham Estate Inn (Charlotte).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p122-126, 128, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7139
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Azalea Garden Tour is a highlight of the annual North Carolina Azalea Festival, which is held in Wilmington. The Cape Fear Garden Club has hosted this tour for the past fifty-two years. Block discusses the club's long association with this event.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p138-142, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7143
Author(s):
Abstract:
Without the efforts of Sally Phifer Williamson, Concord's Memorial Garden might have been lost. In 1930, she discovered the three-acre garden, originally the First Presbyterian Church's graveyard, in a terrible state of disrepair. Williamson had the area cleaned up before her death in 1937. Her son watched over the garden for the next twenty-nine years and left a one-million-dollar endowment for its upkeep. There are over 300 graves there amid 16,000 tulips and 120 varieties of azaleas.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p160-163, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Holly Springs resident Truett Garner learned his whittling skills from his grandfather. A trained drafter, he creates ornate walking sticks out of old tobacco sticks. Daniel discusses Garner's work and creations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p176-178, 180, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7142
Author(s):
Abstract:
A thirty-one-foot dogwood tree, discovered in 1995 in Sampson County by A.J. Bullard of Mount Olive, has been declared the nation's tallest by the National Register of Big Trees. The dogwood has a crown spread of forty-eight feet. The tree stands in Sampson County's Matthis Cemetery, which dates back to the Civil War.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p156-157, il Periodical Website
Full Text: