NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Shells
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2833
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether you are a professional, like Hugh Porter, curator of the University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Science, or an amateur, the state's coastal waters contain over 1,000 species of mollusks that attract shell collectors.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p8-13, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
3266
Author(s):
Abstract:
The scotch bonnet, the state's official seashell, is rarely larger than three inches and possesses distinctive colorations. The rare shell is highly prized by collectors.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Few people can walk along a beach and not be attracted by the wide variety of seashells, which are the calcium carbonate homes for a large, diverse group of invertebrates called mollusks. Early civilizations used them for utensils and currency and to make dyes. Today people eat them, wear them as jewelry, and use them for road building. The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort houses one of the largest seashell collection in the country, the Watson Shell Collection.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p45-46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16407
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Holy Ghost Shell, or the Sand Dollar, is found along the beaches and strands of the Atlantic seaboard and in profusion along the beaches of North Carolina. When the shell is broken open, several symbols are revealed that includes the star of Bethlehem, the Easter Lily, and five points symbolic of the five wounds given Christ before crucifixion.
Record #:
24550
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author provides an overview of the types of shells found on North Carolina’s coast and how to collect, clean, and display them in an artistic manner.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 1, June 1975, p18-20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
25089
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many types of mollusks in North Carolina. Most people notice the shells when they go to the beach. These shells are identified and a description of the animal that lives within is given.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2013, p21-23, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
9704
Author(s):
Abstract:
A treasure trove in shells can be found on the state's Outer Banks. Griffin discusses types of shells to be found and gives pointers on collecting them.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
3970
Author(s):
Abstract:
On any given summer day, vacationers can be seen on the state's beaches picking up tulips, olives, and bonnets. However, they are anything but what their names imply. They are part of the vast array that many vacationers find too enchanting to leave behind.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
35774
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s purpose for collecting seashells could be considered unconventional and creative: simulated floral bouquets. Places she proposed to collect shells included fishermen’s nets to fish supply houses. Tools to use, Moore recommended hot glue gun and tweezers, assorted glues and cements, manicure scissors and toothpicks. For cleaning, the author recommended Clorox; for restoring color, oil.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p13