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6 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014
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Record #:
34643
Author(s):
Abstract:
This two-part interview sheds light on a little-known German internment camp in the western landscape of North Carolina. Both authors interviews, Ron Rash and Terry Roberts, released works of fiction regarding the camp in 2012. Roberts focuses on the camp located in the Mountain Park Hotel, and its manager and internees, while Rash develops a love story between an escaped internee and a local woman. Both novels address the tensions between the two groups, as well as how the Germans began to integrate into society and form relationships.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p30-47, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34642
Author(s):
Abstract:
In his long career as a writer and businessman, James E. McGirt bestowed praise and admiration for the Spanish-American War, the Philippine-American War, and the involvement of African-American soldiers. While he acknowledges that people of color had been mistreated by white Americans before, he does not concede the similarities in treatment towards Cuban and Filipino citizens during this war. His work, therefore, has been criticized for being a sugarcoated, glossy view of American expansionism and African-American opinions.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p18-29, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34644
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the beginning of World War II, Arthur Miller, before he became a world-renowned playwright, recorded interviews with civilians in North Carolina. Outside of Wilmington, he discussed the impacts on the shipping industry, African-American workers and strikes, and wartime attitudes against fascism. The interviews comment on the industry and population boom brought in by the wartime effort, as well as lament the loss of small-town life and cultural changes.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p48-59, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34641
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article focuses on interviews conducted with Robert Morgan, a native North Carolina author of historical fiction. He discusses his choice to make the main character a woman, the balance he must create between the character’s point of view and the history of the battle, and his inspirations throughout his writing career.
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Record #:
34656
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Forstchen’s novel “One Second After” focuses on a fictional post-apocalyptic event that takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina. After an electromagnetic pulse devastates the entire United States, the small town reverts to a militaristic, patriarchal society that secludes itself from the rest of the world. Amende notes the “Southern” traditions that the town leaders continuously attribute to their success of survival: Christian political and religious beliefs, military values, and keeping away “outsiders”.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p68-77, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34657
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles W. Chestnutt was one of the few African Americans to make their way into the white publishing circuit. His work was highly critical of white abuse and power struggle of the South, which Baggett argues is the reason his work was not as far-reaching or successful as Booker T. Washington, another highly regarded African American writer at time.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p80-94, il, por, f Periodical Website