NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 91 Issue 3, July 2014
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
22714
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1870, African American state militia were mobilized in New Bern to face the Klu Klux Klan in North Carolina's state capitol, Raleigh. Under the command of George B. Willis, the militia attempted to stem violence from the Klan since the election of Republican William W. Holden in 1868. After two severe crimes, Holden mobilized two militia regiments under William J. Clarke (including Willis' troops) and George W. Kirk. The conflict became known as the Kirk-Holden War. This event, and the work of black North Carolinians in the militia, had a significant impact on state Reconstruction policies.
Source:
Record #:
22713
Abstract:
As early as the 1730s, it was discovered that the environment of the Lower Cape Fear was suited for growing rice, and small-scale rice cultivation flourished. Although the rice industry was often overshadowed by naval stores, it had a long-lasting effect on the colonial economy and laid a foundation for agricultural growth and broader Atlantic trade into the nineteenth century.
Source:
Record #:
22715
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
Source: