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11 results for Holden, William Woods, 1818-1892
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Record #:
9942
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In 1868, former Raleigh newspaper editor William W. Holden was elected Governor of North Carolina. Following accounts of civil unrest in Alamance and Caswell counties, Holden declared martial law and delegated enforcement to Col. George W. Kirk, who raised a force of 670 men, took over the courthouses in Graham and Yanceyville, made himself military dictator of the two counties, and arrested more than 100 persons. Subsequent to the Kirk-Holden War, as it came to be known, Holden was impeached by the House of Representatives on charges of illegally arresting 105 citizens, recruiting soldiers illegally, and refusing to obey a writ of habeas corpus. Holden was convicted on six of eight charges and became the only North Carolina Governor to be removed from office by impeachment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
14623
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John W. Ellis was state governor at the opening of the Civil War. Ellis was born and raised in Rowan County and served in county legislature until elected Judge of Superior Court in 1848. He would become governor with a victory over William W. Holden on the eve of warfare. Governorship would be short for Ellis who died July 4, 1861. Though Ellis did not serve the state during the Civil War, he made a lasting impression when early in the conflict he refused Lincoln North Carolina troops to fight the insurrection.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 27, Nov 1946, p11, 21-22
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Record #:
15274
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Josiah Turner Jr. of Orange County was the aggressive editor of the Reconstruction Period in North Carolina. In 1868 he purchased the Raleigh Sentinel and began his caustic and uncompromising crusade against Reconstruction. His major life work was the toppling of the Republican administration of Governor W. W. Holden and finally his impeachment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 22, Oct 1934, p18, 26, por
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Record #:
15565
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During the Civil War an opposition group to the fighting developed in North Carolina. Called the Heroes of America and headquartered to the west of Raleigh in nine counties, the group was a highly secret society that did everything possible to undermine the efforts of the Confederacy to win independence. One of the more vocal leaders of the Peace Movement was William Woods Holden, the editor of the NORTH CAROLINA STANDARD.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 6, Nov 2011, p66-68, 70, 72, 74, 76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19964
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Both President Lincoln and President Johnson proclaimed an act of amnesty for all persons who served the Confederacy during the war if they agreed to swear an oath of loyalty to the United States. The author examines the specific provisions President Johnson established in his plan to restore to North Carolina; a plan which was very favorable to the state because of North Carolinian's pro-Union supporters during the Civil War. The article also details Governor Holden's actions to fulfill the requirements of President Johnson's plan and how this affected former soldiers.
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Record #:
20213
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Considered as one of North Carolina's controversial figures, William W. Holden was a leading editor, leader in four political parties, and chief executive of the state on two occasions. Holden also built the Democratic Party to dominance in North Carolina but controversy over controlled interests forced him to split from the party. By 1860, Holden shifted from his militant view of state succession, promoting the role of North Carolina as a mediator, or peace maker, against the overthrow of national government.
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Record #:
21424
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Throughout his career in public service, William Woods Holden was a very controversial figure. During his tenure as governor of North Carolina, Holden angered the opposition by his response and actions against the violence of the Ku Klux Klan, the violation of political rights in the Piedmont region, and by several reckless political situations. In 1870, the General Assembly impeached Holden and convicted him of violating the civil liberties of certain citizens. This ruling barred him from ever holding public office again and he spent the rest of his life unsuccessfully attempting to repeal his disbarment and impeachment.
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Record #:
16158
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Governor William Woods Holden represented the head of a new political movement in the state following the Civil War, the Republican Party. During this point in history, republicans were concerned with protecting newly freed African-American liberties. Holden would be removed from office by a Democratic impeachment after he took action against members of the Klan.
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Record #:
4892
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Following the South's defeat at Gettysburg, Raleigh newspaperman William Woods Holden urged negotiations with the North to bring peace. His peace movement put him at odds with many people, including his old friend Zebulon Vance, who defeated Holden for governor in 1864. North Carolina was the only state that had a peace movement. Confederate troops even sacked Holden's offices and threatened his life. After the war Holden became governor in 1868, but his support of African-American rights and opposition to the Ku Klux Klan led to his impeachment. He was removed from office in 1871, the first U.S. governor to endure this fate.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p24-27, il, por
Record #:
22714
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In July, 1870, African American state militia were mobilized in New Bern to face the Klu Klux Klan in North Carolina's state capitol, Raleigh. Under the command of George B. Willis, the militia attempted to stem violence from the Klan since the election of Republican William W. Holden in 1868. After two severe crimes, Holden mobilized two militia regiments under William J. Clarke (including Willis' troops) and George W. Kirk. The conflict became known as the Kirk-Holden War. This event, and the work of black North Carolinians in the militia, had a significant impact on state Reconstruction policies.
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Record #:
37690
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Biography of Judge George W. Brooks (1821-1882) a native of Pasquotank County, NC, became a lawyer and then a Federal Judge. He became the greatest hero of Reconstruction Days in North Carolina by writing a writ of Habeus corpus to protect white men being held illegally by the military government imposed on Alamance and Caswell counties. His action has been credited with breaking up the power of the so called Carpet Bag Government of Gov. William Holden.