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4 results for Rice farmers--Lower Cape Fear
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Record #:
9183
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the 1720s, rice was becoming a staple crop in North Carolina. In 1860, the rice yield from the Lower Cape Fear region reached eight million pounds. Swamp land had to be cleared to plant rice and slaves were used to cultivate and harvest the crop. Although rice continued to be grown after the Civil War, rice-growing in North Carolina came to a cessation in the 1890s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p14-16, 39, il
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Record #:
21092
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wealthy planters from the St. James Goose Creek Parish, 20 miles north of Charleston, established a permanent settlement in the Lower Cape Fear in the 1720s and introduced rice as a new agricultural staple in North Carolina.
Record #:
4896
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once almost 30 rice plantations producing millions of pounds of rice annually lined the lower Cape Fear River and its tributaries. Rice grew there from the 18th-century till the last harvest in 1931. Today the land is a refuge for wildlife. The North Carolina Coastal Land Trust has conserved 4,000 acres of this land and seeks to save more before developers can move in.
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Record #:
22713
Abstract:
As early as the 1730s, it was discovered that the environment of the Lower Cape Fear was suited for growing rice, and small-scale rice cultivation flourished. Although the rice industry was often overshadowed by naval stores, it had a long-lasting effect on the colonial economy and laid a foundation for agricultural growth and broader Atlantic trade into the nineteenth century.
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