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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 90 Issue 3, July 2013
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Record #:
22701
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Abstract:
Greensboro, North Carolina became a central location for the civil rights movement in the 1960s starting with the North Carolina A&T sit-in. Within the Greensboro location, Elreta Alexander was a prominent African American attorney who advocated for civil rights through the judicial system.
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Record #:
22703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although largely forgotten in North Carolina history apart from a public park in his honor, Hugh MacRae (1865-1951) was an urban businessman who fostered economic opportunity and development, especially as related to southern farmers. After graduating from MIT, McRae returned to Wilmington in 1892 where he later consolidated gas, railway, light and power interests and promoted the development of several suburban communities. He later shifted his attention to the development of truck farms and model communities in southeastern North Carolina and the transformation of rural life through small-scale, intensive farming practices.
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Record #:
22702
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although typically described as remote and isolated from national trends in developments in politics, economics, and social trends, there were places within the post-bellum South that were connected and influenced by larger centers of news and power. For example, Weldon, North Carolina became not only an important regional center for industry and commerce, but also a place to taken in broader cultural and economic trends of the late-nineteenth century, often spurred by the success of railroads.
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