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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Farming--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
15002
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of mountain farmers are leaving their small tracts of rocky soil in the western part of North Carolina and are taking up acreage in the coastal plain section. Between the American Revolution and the American Civil War, many people of the coastal plain and piedmont moved into the mountains, but now that the soil has worn out and washed away, they are moving back to the east.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 41, Mar 1943, p1, 25, f
Full Text:
Record #:
23134
Author(s):
Abstract:
Luton Farms, located near Roper, North Carolina, harvests sweet potatoes and collards during the autumn months. Owners Charles and Scot discuss farming techniques, market days, and preparing dishes that feature these crops.
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Record #:
22703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although largely forgotten in North Carolina history apart from a public park in his honor, Hugh MacRae (1865-1951) was an urban businessman who fostered economic opportunity and development, especially as related to southern farmers. After graduating from MIT, McRae returned to Wilmington in 1892 where he later consolidated gas, railway, light and power interests and promoted the development of several suburban communities. He later shifted his attention to the development of truck farms and model communities in southeastern North Carolina and the transformation of rural life through small-scale, intensive farming practices.
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Record #:
23714
Author(s):
Abstract:
“The Dipping Vat War” There had always been a problem with “Cattle Ticks” making cows sickly and puny on NC farms. After WWI experiments were done to combat cattle ticks by building cement vats and bathing cows in a poison arsenic mixture several times. It appeared to work and the cows grew fat and started producing milk again. But there were those around Pitt County who refused to be ordered by the government to have their cattle dipped. Unknown parties blew up government vats with dynamite, threatened other farmers, and shot at vat workers. In 1920 the Pitt County Commissioners authorized the vat campaign to be shut down for the safety for everyone; but were well pleased with dipping campaign as a whole and Pitt County was taken off the North Carolina tick quarantine list.