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5 results for North Carolina Historic Preservation Office Newsletter Vol. Issue , Fall 1994
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Record #:
2022
Abstract:
Since the 1700s, the Southern folk cemetery has been a means of family identification and bonding over generations, but with increased family mobility in the 20th-century the traditions of the folk cemetery are being abandoned.
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Record #:
2037
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Abstract:
Graves and cemeteries are normally not considered eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, and those that are must reflect strict criteria. North Carolina does not have a single individually listed grave in the Register.
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Record #:
2035
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Abstract:
One of the most unscrupulous acts of artifact looting in North Carolina took place in the winter of 1983 when the Durham County grave of William Preston Mangum, a Confederate officer killed at First Manassas in 1861, was robbed.
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Record #:
2038
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Abstract:
African-American grave markers in New Hanover, Davidson, Lincoln, and Cumberland Counties tend to be creative in style and inscription, yet fragile due to materials used. Traditional markers are the mound, head and foot, enclosure, and sculpture.
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Record #:
2036
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Abstract:
Ensuring that gravestones are preserved requires that preservationists have a good knowledge of cleaning techniques and gravestone repair techniques.
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