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7 results for North Carolina Geographer Vol. 13 Issue , 2005
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Record #:
16991
Abstract:
The population of the Charlotte metropolitan region has grown rapidly in recent decades. Typically, metropolitan population growth is accompanied by significant increases in the number of municipal governments and a corresponding increase in political fragmentation. However, compared to other rapidly growing areas, relatively few new municipal governments have been created in the Charlotte region. This article explores the impact of state annexation and incorporation policy and historical, economic and cultural legacy on the development of the municipal landscape in the Charlotte Urban Region.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p17-30, map, bibl
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Record #:
16992
Abstract:
The concept that humans may be contributing to an atypical warming of Earth's atmosphere has received increasing attention in the scientific community in recent decades. Partially due to the increased focus on climate change or global warming, regional and urban climate change has also received attention. This article investigates the differences in temperature trends during a 40-year period in urbanized and urbanizing areas in North Carolina, examining maximum and minimum temperatures to show if urbanized areas exhibit significant increasing trends in temperatures.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p31-45, map, bibl
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Record #:
16990
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Abstract:
Using archival research, map analysis, and field study, Burke attempts to determine the route used by the stagecoach line of the Wilmington and Raleigh Rail Road, to locate modern roads that closely approximate the state route, and compare the present landscape along the route with descriptions of that provided in historic documents.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p1-16, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
16994
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Abstract:
The Appalachian mountains of North Carolina have a long history of producing destructive debris flows. Steep slopes, a thin soil mantle, and extreme precipitation events all exacerbate the probability of slope instability in the region. For this article, modern accounts of debris flows have been reviewed to construct a history and estimate the frequency of debris flows in the French Broad watershed.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p59-82, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
16993
Abstract:
Over the past decade the Hispanic population has been fastest growing race/ethnic group in the United States. North Carolina is one state that has experienced a Hispanic population boom. However, this growth is not evenly distributed throughout the state. This article questions the driving forces that determine the location and growth mechanisms of Hispanic population clusters in the state.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p46-58, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
19395
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The author proposes a curriculum to teach eighth grade social studies students to the states Native American populations. To inform students about this topic, the lesson plans are structured around cultural geography lessons as an introduction to Native American history. There are three objectives for this course: identify Carolina Native American populations, describe Native American influence on colonial life, and analyze demographics and their impact on the state's society and economy.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p86-103, il
Record #:
19394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte has been one of the state's fastest growing cities in the past fifteen years. Since 1990, city officials and private corporations have turned the city's economic foundation from low-wage manufacturing jobs to a major banking center. The author reviews the city's successful economic growth and how the model could be applied to other cities.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p82-85