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7 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017
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Record #:
28564
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Abstract:
In wake of Hurricane Matthew’s devastation in North Carolina, state and local officials are looking for creative suggestions from university faculty and students. One option for long-term recovery is Community Scale Assisted Migration, a program that helps move residents out of the floodplain by keeps them near their community.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28560
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Abstract:
Cape shark, also known as spiny dogfish, is typically abundant in North Carolina waters. Students at Cape Hatteras Secondary School created special cape shark recipes, and hope to spread awareness about the importance of fresh, local seafood. They are also developing tools to communicate cape shark research to the public.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28563
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Abstract:
North Carolina Sea Grant’s Marine Fisheries Fellowship program has given graduate students the opportunity to work directly in fisheries and resource management. Four former marine fisheries fellows from 2016 are now conducting research from the continental shelf of Florida to the lakes of Oregon.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p21-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28565
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Abstract:
The Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST), a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, helps with recovery of cultural heritage collections. Following Hurricane Matthew, CREST held workshops on properly cleaning and preserving personal documents, and developed a database of institutions affected by the hurricane.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28559
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Abstract:
Research on the North Carolina coast reveals the toxic nature of marine snow as algal blooms die and sink to the seafloor. This study was the first to document how toxins are produced throughout marine snow formation and how long they persist in the environment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28562
Abstract:
Undergraduate students at Chowan University are studying wetland accretion and change. Their work is part of the North Carolina Collaborative Research Grant Program.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p19-20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Danielle Keller, a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences, describes how changing seagrass cover in North Carolina waters might affect juvenile fish.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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