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10 results for Sea level rise--North Carolina, Coastal
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Record #:
19328
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Given global climate change coastal areas such as along North Carolina will have to battle with associated changes like sea level rise. Friday discusses the worst and best case scenarios that coastal North Carolinians will face as the seas encroach over the sands.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 15 Issue 7, Aug 1988, p5-6, map Periodical Website
Record #:
23187
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Sea levels are rising and Billman discusses what North Carolina is doing to counter this; though, it turns out, the state chooses to ignore the problem rather than face it head on.
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Record #:
25290
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At the meeting of the Senate Agriculture, Environment and Natural Resources committee, Dr. Stanley Riggs pointed out the alarming rate of sea level rise in North Carolina and its causes as well as ways to prevent further rise.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p7, il
Record #:
25342
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Sea level rise is not only caused by environmental factors, but is exacerbated by the actions of man. This could cause a rise of 1-2 meters rather than 1-2 feet.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Winter 2010, p1
Record #:
25524
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In a two-year study along North Carolina’s coast, the effects of sea-level rise and saltwater exposure on freshwater amphibians were investigated. Research findings show that the green tree frog has shown the ability to thrive in habitats of higher salinity than other frog species. These results are derived from the discovery of green tree frogs living and thriving in saltwater marshes of relatively high salinity.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p20-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22590
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Margaret Garner, a doctoral candidate in East Carolina University's Coastal Resources Management Program, is using the unique environments of the Rachel Carson Reserve to see what might happen to North Carolina's coast if sea level rise continues.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p28-33, il Periodical Website
Record #:
28562
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Undergraduate students at Chowan University are studying wetland accretion and change. Their work is part of the North Carolina Collaborative Research Grant Program.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p19-20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28822
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Last December, world leaders gathered in Paris to discuss strategies for curbing greenhouse gas emissions. Climate change is a global issue and impacting the North Carolina coast through sea level rise. However, climate change is being ignored by American politicians and lawmakers.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 45, Nov 2016, p10-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34082
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Scientists at the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort claim that property owners in the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system who try to protect houses against erosion and sea level rise by installing bulkheads and dikes could eventually destroy the East Coast’s most important marine fisheries estuary. This article discusses wetlands, sea level rise, and the long-term impacts to North Carolina.
Record #:
39726
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A National Science Foundation grant-funded study examined the relationship between these factors: an economy driven by industries such as tourism and defense; public policies; a 301-mile shoreline vulnerable to elevating sea levels and more frequent hurricanes. The study’s goal: predict how culminated climatic changes will impact people’s receptiveness to buying property in counties such as Dare, Carteret, and New Hanover.