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7 results for Carolina Planning Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006
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Record #:
8266
Abstract:
The North Carolina Physical Activity Policy Research Center was established in 2004 to conduct research on physical activity and policy. The center brings together faculty and researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health and the College of Arts and Sciences. Current projects include understanding and documenting policies that affect walking and bicycling to school, trail development, and community planning decisions related to physical activity.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p13-18, il, bibl
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Record #:
8268
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A school facility is the most expensive public facility that is provided by North Carolina state and local governments. Beyond academic instruction, the school facilities can become activity centers for the communities surrounding them. Land costs, however, are usually the bottom line in school development rather than the positive and negative implications that the location of schools facilities can have on an area. Lentz discusses the school location and development issue and describes what steps Cabarrus County took to improve the process.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p26-30, il, f
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Record #:
8267
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Efforts to improve the understanding of policy and environmental attributes that may support active lifestyles have become a promising area for collaboration between planning and public health professionals. Aytur highlights the results of work performed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill examining the relationship between planning policies and physical activity and the prevalence of land use policies and implementation tools that might support the viability of non-motorized modes.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p19-25, il, bibl
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Record #:
8265
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Many twenty-first century communities are characterized by separated land uses, automobile-dominated design, and inattention to the population. Research supports the contention that the health of communities is determined by how those communities are planned and designed. Solomon discusses the connection between planning and public health, the need to include local public health departments in planning decisions, and how agencies across the country have worked together to improve health outcomes and quality of life in their communities.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p3-12, bibl
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Record #:
8282
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North Carolina responded to the Hurricane Katrina disaster by deploying the State Medical Assistance Team (SMAT) to Waveland, Mississippi. Rudisill helped lead the first deployment of the field hospital, and her article describes what took place. North Carolina's response was so effective that the SMAT effort is now recognized nationally as a model system for disaster response.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p32-36, il
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Record #:
8283
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Randy Mundt maps floodplains for the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management. He is well versed in hazard mitigation, or stopping disasters before they start. In this CAROLINA PLANNING interview, Mundt discusses the roles of the state and local governments in hazard mitigation, the effects of Hurricane Katrina on North Carolina hazard mitigation, and the role of insurance companies.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p42-45
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Record #:
16012
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Emergency officials are always searching for glitches in their disaster plans. Drills are rarely sufficient and sooner or later, planners must experience the real thing to find inevitable kinks in their systems. And that is what Hurricane Floyd did--it exposed flaws in hurricane preparedness that North Carolina is working to fix.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p37-41, bibl
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