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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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103 results for "Washington the Magazine"
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Record #:
41279
Abstract:
The Elmwood 1820’s long history in the community includes serving as a hospital during the Civil War. This plantation had housed just seven families before its transformation into a bed and breakfast in 2015. Today, it is a repository for local history, represented in Elmwood-related memorabilia the current owners are collecting for its 200th anniversary.
Record #:
41280
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Built for Rocky Mount Mill workers and situated on its campus, these renovated houses are serving as nightly rentals. The River and Twine's potential perks include nearby art, music, and indoor sports venues, in addition to restaurants and breweries.
Record #:
36149
Abstract:
A former vaudeville theater located upstairs in Washington's Turnage Theater may be one of the best of its kind still in existence according Emily Rebert, the City of Washington's community development planner and also master's candidate at Savannah College of Art and Design. It is hoped Rebert's work will lead to funding opportunities for restoration.
Record #:
37379
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Castle Island’s faces feature an illustrious and notorious history in writing and action. East Carolina University’s Maritime Studies department documented information about wrecked ships in the area in their report “The Castle Island’s Ships Graveyard.” The Civil War-era encampment site for Yankees can also claim goats as its first inhabitants. Terry Rollins’ Washington Haunts tours points to a notorious past in a madam, known as the “Queen on the Castle,” reputed to inhabit the Island in spirit. As for the printed reproductions of postcards from UNC-CH’s collection and a painting in Washington’s Brown Library accompanying the article, they can speak a thousand words about the Island’s colorful past.
Record #:
37380
Abstract:
The North Carolina Estuarium educates schoolchildren across North Carolina and visitors from around the globe about aquatic life in the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system. Its curriculum includes interactive exhibits, topics such as the biology of the blue crab and a lesson in sculpture, pictured, showing how the food chain works. This miracle on many levels has been possible since 1998 through the collaboration of donors, volunteers, elected officials, board members, and the parent organization Partnership for the Sounds.
Record #:
37381
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A self-described “treasure hunter” has a collection that has made Washington a site for discovering and rediscovering treasure and treasured possessions. Pictures of his unburied treasure included a Spanish silver real coin from the 18th century and an epaulette from the 19th century. Proving treasure doesn’t have to be relic aged was a class ring, belonging to a soldier deployed in Iraq, who recovered his ring as a result of local Junius Swain’s discovery.
Record #:
39525
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An historical home in Washington has become a haven for female veterans recovering from military sexual trauma. Described is a brief history of the Rose Haven House, the house’s original owner, and services that the house’s residents receive as part of their recovery.
Record #:
39524
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Debnam described how key individuals, events, and ships played in the development of Washington’s past shipbuilding and shipping firms and today’s boat building and tourist industries.
Record #:
40661
Abstract:
The Historic Bath Garden Club recreates the twelve days of Christmas, 18th-century style, at historic sites such as the Bonner House and Palmer Marsh House. This event highlights those citizens' version of the season, such as sparser decorations, plus a greater emphasis on companionship and January 6th.
Record #:
40745
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A display, begun to celebrate a family member’s life, is part of the YuleTide celebration for many as 10,000 annually. This display, touted as the second largest in the state, started with an angel and a few lights that symbolized Hoggard’s late niece. Two dozen year later, its wonderful factors include half a million lights and a host of decorations, of which 80% are handmade.
Record #:
37320
Abstract:
In the area of Washington formerly known as “Pungo Town,” the Federal Style residence built by two brothers has changed little since its construction in 1795. Passed down to members of the Marsh family until 1942, a relative of former owners restored the house to National Trust preservation guidelines as part of her master’s thesis. The Congletons continue the architectural integrity tradition for the residence whose housing history includes Union officers during the Civil War.
Record #:
37316
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The focal point on Main Street for four decades has become the main attraction anew through additions to its facility, in time for the annual fossil festival. In its buildings are the gift shop and learning center. Outside are mounds for intrepid fossil hunters. The boon for the museum and Aurora year around: visitors from all fifty states, as well as faraway countries and continents.
Record #:
34403
Abstract:
The Washington Garden Club meets once a month to share their gardening experiences and ideas with one another. Organized by women in 1941, it became a federated club, National Garden Club, and the Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc., and is now a very strong and active organization. Each May, they host a plant sale at the North Carolina Estuarium, with proceeds supporting the club’s gardens at the Market and Gladden street intersection.
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Record #:
34405
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Abstract:
The churches of Beaufort County have histories dating back centuries. The first, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, is the oldest church building in North Carolina, with an active parish dating back more than three-hundred years. This article provides the histories of Beaufort County churches based on materials from the Brown Library in Washington, interviews with church historians and official histories of each church.
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