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57 results for "The Palace"
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Record #:
37382
Abstract:
An exploration revealed its many purposes since 1784. Home for John Stanly Wright's family until the Civil War, it was General Burnside’s New Bern headquarters and a convent for the Sisters of Mercy through 1884. Heirs of James Bryan owned the house until 1932, when it was sold to the New Bern Library Association. The house was the town’s library for three decades before Tryon Palace Commission purchased the building, restored its Georgian style, and moved it to its current location, George Street.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p6-8
Record #:
37385
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tryons’ collection of books, which functioned as a library for the community’s upper classes, is a visit-worthy aspect for tours. Of the seven books described, three include photos, notably the reproduced likeness of Jonathan Swift’s The Works of Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, Volume III” (1768). Other noteworthy aspects of the collection include books reflecting Mary Tryon’s interest in military history, unusual for that time’s upper-class women.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p24-26
Record #:
37383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Why the capital shifted from New Bern was for a practical and typical two-fold reason. Because of the amount of time it took to travel in the 1700s, the state’s capital was best located in the center of wherever the population was the densest. This factor left Fayetteville as a prospective place before Raleigh was selected.
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Record #:
37384
Author(s):
Abstract:
18th and 19th were work tables were gender-bound, based on the typed of work done. Other purposes expanded the types of work beyond sewing, such as writing. Moving them out into other areas of the home justified features such as fancy veneer, seen in the pictured work table that is an exemplary example of conservation labor.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p18-19
Record #:
23166
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern's Civil War history stretches beyond the Confederacy. The Union invasion of Roanoke, followed by the occupation of New Bern in 1862 promoted the establishment of contraband camps for escaped slaves. Colored troop regiments emerged as a result.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p20-21, 26, il, por
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Record #:
23165
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tryon Palace reopened the New Bern Academy Museum, a place that tells the story of union occupation in New Bern. The building itself is a historic site, for Union troops used it as a hospital during the war.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p16-19, il
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Record #:
37266
Author(s):
Abstract:
A portrait of Mary Daves McKinlay was represented in a painting, passed down to her namesake niece, that revealed an outer gentility. A portrait painted in words also revealed gentility, in actions such as financial generosity to surviving family and the Episcopal Church of New Bern, and a view of slavery ahead of her times. Her enduring mark on New Bern may be perceived in her marker in Cedar Grove Cemetery. It may also be perceived in the pictured tablet, made by the Daves family and now in Christ Church’s graveyard.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p22-24
Record #:
37258
Author(s):
Abstract:
New acquisitions to Tyron Palace’s exhibition collection included items that needed extra care, hence on display during special exhibitions. The exhibits spotlighted were a Magic Lantern Projector, 19th century; a Civil War-era Powder Horn; a Civil War-era folding chair used by Captain Frederick Cox Roberts; a liquor jug, 19th century, from A.H. Holton Retail Liquor.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p6-7
Record #:
37261
Abstract:
Described was the labor of love involved in the restoration of a lathe originally owned by Charles Henry Hall. Courtesy of its passage down through the centuries by Hall’s nephew, Charles Hall Ashford, Jr., and L.R. Thomas Jr., the lathe is part of the Palace’s collection of human powered tools.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p8-11
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
37415
Author(s):
Abstract:
A description of the Tryon Palace kitchen soon gave way to kitchens of the Colonial period. In its focus on the importance of that room in Colonial homes, it noted kitchens as places likely for making medicine and food. Noted places for storage of recipes for food and herbal remedies were cookbooks and servants’ books.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p12-13
Record #:
37414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tyron Palace conservationists offered painstaking effort to restore the windows, installed in 1959, to their original state. Described in detail was the process of restoring this part of the Palace. It is equivalent to efforts taken in other Palace projects, such as restoring the gazebo spire in the Stanly House gardens.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p8-9
Record #:
37413
Author(s):
Abstract:
A close examination was offered to three of the Palace's recent acquisitions. These were Eastern Piedmont pottery from the 19th and 20th centuries; manuscript collections from Judge William J. Gaston, whose accomplishments include penning “The Old North State”; a map of the Battle of New Bern, a 1900 blueprint copy of a map drawn by an unidentified Union soldier.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p6-7
Record #:
37416
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just as important as the houses making up the Palace are gardens that help make the Palace pleasing and productive. Among the 14 noted gardens attesting the sophisticated techniques of Colonial gardeners are the Kellenberger, Latham, Etteinne Mitchell, and Kitchen. Along with descriptions citing their functions in the Palace’s daily operations, pictures reflect the beauty the gardens add to the Palace grounds.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p20-23
Record #:
18972
Author(s):
Abstract:
First used as a medicinal drink in Asian, tea became a commodity that fueled the British Empire and sparked revolution in the American colonies. In North Carolina, it would prove to be a catalyst for the first political actions by women in the state's history.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 11 Issue 6, Spring 2012, p16-30, il, f
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