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57 results for "The Palace"
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Record #:
18993
Abstract:
April 2002 marks the 225th anniversary of the first North Carolina General Assembly, which met at the Palace in New Bern where the state of North Carolina was born.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring 2002, p4-5
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Record #:
19026
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Abstract:
A unique artifact has made its way back to Tryon Palace, New Bern, North Carolina. Constructed in 1861 by Edwin Clayton, a cabinet maker from Asheville, this Civil War drum is emblazoned with OLD NORTH STATE and penned on the bottom--\"Captured in Newbern [sic] N.C. March 14 1862,...\"
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p3, 6, il, f
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Record #:
37384
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Abstract:
18th and 19th were work tables were gender-bound, based on the typed of work done. Other purposes expanded the types of work beyond sewing, such as writing. Moving them out into other areas of the home justified features such as fancy veneer, seen in the pictured work table that is an exemplary example of conservation labor.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p18-19
Record #:
19052
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two years into the Union occupation of New Bern, the city became worse for wear due to influx of yellow fever, causing rapid deterioration of lives.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 10 Issue 6, Summer 2011, p14-26, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
19050
Abstract:
Descendants of the Holland family of New Bern donated a life-sized portrait of a young Craven County woman to Tryon Palace. Efforts to conserve this portrait have been very fruitful.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 10 Issue 4, Summer 2010, p10-17, f
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Record #:
37417
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Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
37414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tyron Palace conservationists offered painstaking effort to restore the windows, installed in 1959, to their original state. Described in detail was the process of restoring this part of the Palace. It is equivalent to efforts taken in other Palace projects, such as restoring the gazebo spire in the Stanly House gardens.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p8-9
Record #:
19006
Abstract:
An 18th century silver kettle believed to have once been of use at Tryon Palace has returned home. Acquisitions like this will help staff with appropriate interpretations.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 2004, p9, f
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Record #:
18995
Abstract:
Although a regal residence, Tryon Palace could only function by the work of spinners, weavers, cooks, and the like in performing their daily chores.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p4-5, f
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Record #:
19001
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old New Bern Academy has had a long history since it was built in 1809, enduring the Civil War and becoming part of the public school system in 1971. But thanks to a dedicated group of volunteers, the New Bern Academy has new life as it reopens as a museum.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Summer 2003, p4-5, 8, f
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Record #:
37416
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Just as important as the houses making up the Palace are gardens that help make the Palace pleasing and productive. Among the 14 noted gardens attesting the sophisticated techniques of Colonial gardeners are the Kellenberger, Latham, Etteinne Mitchell, and Kitchen. Along with descriptions citing their functions in the Palace’s daily operations, pictures reflect the beauty the gardens add to the Palace grounds.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p20-23
Record #:
37266
Author(s):
Abstract:
A portrait of Mary Daves McKinlay was represented in a painting, passed down to her namesake niece, that revealed an outer gentility. A portrait painted in words also revealed gentility, in actions such as financial generosity to surviving family and the Episcopal Church of New Bern, and a view of slavery ahead of her times. Her enduring mark on New Bern may be perceived in her marker in Cedar Grove Cemetery. It may also be perceived in the pictured tablet, made by the Daves family and now in Christ Church’s graveyard.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p22-24
Record #:
18996
Abstract:
In October stakeholder gathered at the former site of New Bern's Barbour Boat Works as Tryon Palace Historic Site broke ground for a redevelopment project on the Trent River waterfront.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p2, f
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Record #:
19027
Abstract:
A unique Christmas tradition at Tryon Palace is Jonkonnu. A blend of English, African, and Caribbean holiday and spiritual traditions brought to North Carolina by slaves, Jonkonnu celebrations at Tryon include parades and songs.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p4, f
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Record #:
19047
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reimer discusses the preservation of Tryon Palace's famous gardens, including labor intensive archaeological investigations, historical investigations into garden designs and horticulture.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Summer 2009, p4-5, bibl, f
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