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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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288 results for "Tar Heel"
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Record #:
6259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ray recounts the battle of Monroe's Crossroads, which took place on the morning of March 10, 1865, on land now occupied by Fort Bragg. The battle was one of the largest cavalry charges of the Civil War. Three thousand Confederates charged a Union encampment of two thousand soldiers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p43, map
Record #:
6254
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Rhine Research Center Institute for Parapsychology was founded by Dr. J. B. Rhine and others in Durham in 1927 and later moved to Duke University in 1935. Griffin discusses the work of Rhine and his wife, Dr. Louisa Rhine, in this particular field.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p34-35, por
Record #:
6258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seventy-five years after the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk, a new form of flying dominates the skies there - hang gliding. Ames discusses this exciting new sport; Francis Rogallo, the inventor of hang gliding; and John Harris, who operates a hang gliding school.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p18-20, 22, 24, il
Record #:
6251
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1754, Hillsborough, the county seat of Orange County, is a historic spot of serenity in the midst of the bustling, urban Piedmont. Jacobs takes the reader on a guided tour, discussing places and memorable events.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p26-29, il
Record #:
6252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Brantley Aycock Brown, ad man, photographer-publicist, Outer Banks huckster, and legend, is profiled in this Tar Heel article.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p9-10, 44-45, il, por
Record #:
6260
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty square miles of land in the Piedmont, touching Moore, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties, have become famous in recent years for reviving the art of traditional pottery. The first known potter was J. D. Craven, who settled there in 1857. Of the forty or so shops that operated in the region, only a half dozen remain today. Moose discusses the potters and their craft.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p45-47, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
6261
Author(s):
Abstract:
Julian Shakespeare Carr made a fortune off his Durham tobacco enterprise, Bull Durham Smoking Tobacco. He also built a magnificent home there, Somerset Villa, for the then enormous sum of $125,000. Webb discusses Carr and his home.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p27-28, 61, il, por
Record #:
6262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph Wallace King of Winston-Salem paints under the name of Vinciata and possesses an international reputation. King has painted a number of portraits of famous people, including Queen Elizabeth II and Richard Nixon. He has even served as a legislator from Winston-Salem to the North Carolina General Assembly. Carr discusses King's life and work.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p30-31, 61, il
Record #:
6265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte painter Charles Roy Smith is profiled in this TAR HEEL article. His work ranges from landscapes to people in various activities. Smith is known for his close-up style, paintings that force you to focus in on the subject. His paintings sell for between $100 and $2,000, with an average being $500.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p50-51, il, por
Record #:
6267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Valdese, in Burke County, was settled by Waldenses, French-speaking Protestants who came to the area in 1893. Ghigo summarizes their history in Europe and describes this bit of old Europe in the Carolina hills.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p23-24, il
Record #:
6270
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound, a state historic site near Mt. Gilead in Montgomery County, is one of the most important Native American sites in the area. The site represents the northernmost reach of the Mound People along the eastern seaboard. The authors discuss the activities at this on-going archaeological site.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p11-12, il
Record #:
6532
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ruffin-Roulhac House, built in Hillsborough in the early 19th-century, now serves as the town hall. Mayor Fred Cates initiated the project to restore the structure in 1971. Professional architects advised against it because the building was unsound and almost overgrown with vegetation. However, local craftsmen restored the building in ten months. Dodd lists the individuals who owned the house over the years and describes some of its special features.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p24, il
Record #:
6531
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1921, off the coast of North Carolina, the schooner Carroll A. Deering fell victim to the treacherous waters of Diamond Shoals. Lifesavers from four stations responded, but heavy seas and strong wind prevented their boarding the ship for four days. When they did, rescuers found the crew had vanished without a trace. Only three ship's cats were found. The vessel was built at Bath, Maine, in 1919, and was 255 feet long. Total value was $275,000.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p18, 51, il
Record #:
6529
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee recounts the history of Blowing Rock from its humble beginnings as a farm community in the early 1800s to its present-day status as a mecca for tourists and vacationers. A number of famous people have visited there, including Pearl Buck and Margaret Mitchell, and Presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, and Dwight Eisenhower. The town takes its name from a rocky cliff which overlooks John's River Gorge 3,000 feet below and from the Indian legend about the rock.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p20-22, 31, il, map
Record #:
6530
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sessoms profiles Kristi Overton of Greenville, who, at the tender age of nine years, is making her mark in professional waterskiing. She started on skis at the age of four and a half, could slalom (one ski) at five, and was on trick skis at six. In 1978, as the youngest competitor ever in the Nationals, she won fourth place honors behind the Junior Girls Champion, who was an experienced skier three years older than Overton.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p45, il