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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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288 results for "Tar Heel"
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Record #:
29266
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eight years after the United States Senate empaneled the Select Committee on Presidential Activities, its chairman unveils new details surrounding Watergate’s Saturday Night Massacre, October 20, 1973. North Carolina Senator, Sam J. Ervin, Jr., presents these details in his new book called, The Whole Truth.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p10-17, por
Record #:
29268
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents the synopses and status reports for ten of the most widely publicized unsolved North Carolina homicides of the past fifteen years. All of these cases are currently under active investigation either by the State Bureau of Investigation or local law enforcement agencies.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p20-55, il, por
Record #:
29269
Author(s):
Abstract:
Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina is set to convert the new Congress to conservatism, if he can. Among Helms’ priorities is to cut the food stamp program, and make changes in United States foreign policy.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p32-35, por
Record #:
29267
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1977, following his graduation from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Steve Levin set out for Nepal and a trek to Mount Everest. Levin gives his first-hand account of the journey and offers advice on planning a mountaineering adventure.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p20-27, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29277
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elizabeth Hanford Dole of North Carolina is the assistant for public liaison in Ronald Reagan’s White House, former Federal Trade Commissioner, Harvard-educated lawyer, graduate and student body president of Duke University in 1958. This article covers her career in government and how she became the first woman named to a high level position in the new Reagan administration.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p20-23, por
Record #:
29278
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elizabeth “Liddy” Hanford Dole has roots that stretch back through Duke and Durham to Salisbury, where her father, the late John V. Hanford, ran a florist shop. This article covers Elizabeth Dole’s childhood in North Carolina, and how she developed an interest in politics, eventually becoming one of the nation’s most prominent women.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p24-25, por
Record #:
29276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics in Durham is the nation’s only public residential school for the gifted. The school is touted as a means of improving science education throughout the state and as an incentive to help lure the expanding microelectronics industry to North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p14-17, por
Record #:
29270
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Tryon, fourth royal governor of North Carolina, sent numerous handwritten letters to his family in England. The letters described plans for a Newbern Villa, the bilious disorder of his stomach, and his two-month trip exploring the region he was to govern from 1765 to 1771.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p38-41, por, map
Record #:
29285
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edmund McCullough “Eddie” Cameron served with distinction as one of North Carolina’s most influential sports figures. At Duke University, Cameron was head basketball coach for fourteen seasons, head football coach for four seasons, and athletic director for thirty years. Looking back on his involvement in college athletics, Cameron assesses the future of sports, and the challenges of sustaining the athletes and their programs financially.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p48-53, por
Record #:
29280
Author(s):
Abstract:
Every year, millions of Canadian tourists come to North and South Carolina for the mild weather, beaches, and golf. In early December, Governor Jim Hunt proclaimed ‘Canadian Days’ in North Carolina to be held from February 1 through March 15. This is part of an effort to plan, promote, and accommodate tourism in a more efficient way.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p36-37, il
Record #:
29286
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pungo Lake is one of seven National Wildlife Refuges in North Carolina. Located in Washington and Hyde counties, the lake is the southern stop for thousands of geese, swans and ducks migrating along the Atlantic Flyway. The best time to visit Pungo is late October through March, when the waterfowl populations are at their peak.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p54-57, il, por
Record #:
29282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edgar Peters Brown is the new director of the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. Brown comes from Kansas City’s famous Nelson Gallery, and has an impressive resume of training in art history and museum curation. He commends the North Carolina Museum of Art for having the most superlative collection of Old Master paintings.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p42-62, por
Record #:
29283
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the last four years, North Carolina has had a dramatic increase in its skiing industry. With that growth, have come problems of crowding and collisions on the slopes. Now a more solitary version of skiing, called Cross-country or Nordic skiing, is becoming popular in the state.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p44-47, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29279
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group of cartoonists in North Carolina is growing in influence, as they have been gainfully employed on newspapers across the state and nation. This article features eight editorial cartoonists who concentrate on local and national topics, using humor to make a point.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p28-33, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29296
Author(s):
Abstract:
On March 15, 1781, the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in North Carolina was lost by Americans to the British. Despite the British victory, the battle ultimately weakened the British Army and led to General Cornwallis’s surrender at Yorktown.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p34-36, il, por, map