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8 results for North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (Durham)
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Record #:
534
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina School of Science and Math opened in 1980 as the nation's first public, residential high school for students with special aptitude and interest in the sciences and mathematics.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 53 Issue 3, Winter 1988, p8-12, il, f
Record #:
1015
Author(s):
Abstract:
A conflict has arisen between the faculty of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) and John Friedrick, the school's administrative director. NCSSM is the nation's first state-funded residential science and math academy.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 11, Mar 1993, p7-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
7609
Abstract:
The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, a public, residential high school offering 11th- and 12th-graders a specialized program with a strong emphasis on math, science, and technology, opened in 1980. Credit for its creation is largely given to John Ehle, Terry Sanford, and James B. Hunt. The school is located in Durham. The school currently has an enrollment of 625, evenly divided between male and female students. Westbrook describes the admission policy and programs.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p112-114, 116, 118-119, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
11776
Abstract:
This article presents information on the planned School of Science and Mathematics. A site will be named in October from among the three contenders: Charlotte, Raleigh, and Durham.
Source:
Record #:
18233
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1970s, Governor Sanford urged members of the General Assembly to open three specialized schools each focusing specifically on the arts, math and science, and the humanities. Only the school of art, located in Winston-Salem, was realized by Governor Sanford. With Governor Hunt in charge, he persuaded the General Assembly of 1977 and 1979 to establish the school of Math and Science to open in Durham at the end of 1980.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980, p35-38
Record #:
18507
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the fall of 1980, the state opened a public residential high school in Durham, the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. The first of its kind in the nation, the school's mission was two-fold: educating the state's most gifted eleventh and twelfth graders in math and science and working with public schools to improve these areas of study for all students. Two classes of 300 were selected representing 63 of the 100 counties and split equally between male and female students. The school's first year successes and potential improvements are reported on in this article.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Fall 1981, p23-26, il
Record #:
28935
Author(s):
Abstract:
The General Assembly voted, after some confusion, to establish the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. The state high school will focus on the intensive study of science and mathematics. Durham, Charlotte, and Raleigh have expressed interest in providing a home for the school.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p8-11
Record #:
29276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics in Durham is the nation’s only public residential school for the gifted. The school is touted as a means of improving science education throughout the state and as an incentive to help lure the expanding microelectronics industry to North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p14-17, por