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177 results for "Sea Chest"
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Record #:
7555
Abstract:
Before North Carolina began providing ferryboat service, residents of Hatteras Island depended on local ferryboat captains to transport them to the mainland or others islands of the Outer Banks. O'Neal and Tiedt discuss these early ferries and their captains, including Frazier Peele.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p6-12, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
7558
Abstract:
Burrus, who was born on Hatteras Island, was Dare County's first major league baseball player. The Philadelphia Athletics brought him up to the major leagues in 1919. In 1925, he was with the Boston Braves as their regular first baseman. He ended his career in 1930, with Atlanta. In ten years of professional baseball, Burrus had a batting average of .326 and a fielding average of .990. He returned to Hatteras Island where he was a Texaco distributor, fish buyer, and county commissioner. He died in Currituck County in 1972.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p25-27, por
Record #:
7561
Abstract:
In this SEA CHEST interview, Lloyd Styron talks about the early days of blue marlin sportfishing in Outer Banks' waters. The first time anyone fished for blue marlin off the Outer Banks was in 1933, and the second time was in 1936. Styron describes the people who came to fish, the boats and equipment they used for fishing, the size of the marlins they caught, and his experiences accompanying them.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p9-18, il
Record #:
7560
Abstract:
Mrs. John “Odessa” Wasili is a potter and native of Hatteras Island. She lived off the island for a while, working for the government in Washington, D.C. She began studying pottery on the island in 1947. After she moved with her husband to San Francisco, she took a number of adult education classes in pottery. They later returned to Hatteras Island. Wasili is a charter member of the Albemarle Craftsman's Guild and makes pottery for her business, the Pirate's Chest Gift Shop. She discusses her work and creations.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1975, p27-31, il, por
Record #:
7557
Abstract:
In this SEA CHEST interview, Lloyd Styron discusses baseball on Hatteras Island. The first time he played the game was in 1914, and the first game he ever saw was between a team from Washington, North Carolina, and the Hatteras team. The visiting team came by boat. Baseball was played in the morning by boys aged 9-13; the 14-17- year-olds played until mid-afternoon; and the men played until dark. Styron recounts some of the games he played, other players, and players who went on to play major league baseball.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p21-24
Record #:
7565
Abstract:
Preston Stowe discusses his life as a boatbuilder. Stowe's first experience in boatbuilding was in 1938, when he helped his father build a boat. In 1941, he worked at the Norfolk Ship Building and Drydock Company, and in 1942, at a boatyard in Manteo. After the war, he began building his own boats. The largest boat he has built is twenty-six feet and the smallest sixteen feet. Juniper is his main wood source.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p24-28, il
Record #:
7562
Abstract:
Austin has been building boats since he was a young man. He has his own methods for building boats; he has never used any special plans, and he follows his own instinct when building. He uses three tools when building boats in his shop: a dewalt, joiner, and a planer. Austin can build two fourteen-footers a week.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p60-63, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue continues coverage of the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p51-55
Record #:
7564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries contained in the weather station's log books which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. This issue contains selected observations for the years 1875 and 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p16-19, il
Record #:
7563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gordon Watts is the state underwater archaeologist and one of the discoverers of the MONITOR. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses the history of the MONITOR and how it was found.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p2-13, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
7566
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras National Seashore naturalist Clay Gifford discusses the effect of litter on wildlife. Many people who litter along the beaches or in natural areas often do not realize the harm they are creating for wildlife. Among the items Gifford considers a menace to wildlife are monofilament fishing line, plastic six-pack bottle holders, paper from Polaroid films, and cans. Birds can be ensnared, strangled, or poisoned by these items.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p36-37, il
Record #:
7568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb, Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy, first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. In this SEA CHEST interview, he talks about his arrival in Buxton, midwives and their remedies, dipping vats and cattle drives, baseball, and other pastimes.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p48-57, il
Record #:
7567
Abstract:
Austin discusses the fundamentals of net tying. He fished with his brothers from 1925 until he went off to World War II. When more net was needed when fishing, he got the equipment and materials and tied on more net. Austin illustrates fifteen steps in how to tie a fishing net.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p38-43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7582
Abstract:
Rasmus Midgett, a member of the Gull Shore Life Saving Station, was patrolling the beach at nine o'clock on the night of August 18, 1899, when he heard voices calling for help. The barkentine PRISCILLA, which had sailed from Baltimore on August 12, encountered a hurricane near North Carolina. Heavy waves washed the captain's wife, his son, and two crewmen overboard. The hull broke in two, and ten men were clinging to it in pounding waves twenty-five feet from shore. Midgett was three miles from his station--too far to go for help. He went to their assistance and single-handedly rescued all ten men. He was awarded the Gold Medal of Honor for his actions. The medal is the highest award for lifesaving available from the United States government.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p36-39, il, por
Record #:
7575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although coastal life-saving activities date back to 1848 in New Jersey and New York, the United States Life-Saving Service was not officially established until April 20, 1871. Construction of the first three of eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island began in 1874. Stations were usually built five to seven miles apart to insure as much coverage of the beach as possible. The article includes a map which locates the eleven stations and a chart which positions the stations by longitude and latitude.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p3-6, il, map