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12 results for Litter (Trash)
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Record #:
4639
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Lundie Spence, a North Carolina Sea Grant education specialist, has been named a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Hero for 2000. The program recognizes heroes for their tireless efforts in preserving and protecting the country's environment. Spence has been with the Sea Grant program twenty-two years. Among her environmental efforts is Big Sweep in North Carolina, a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program is now in all 100 North Carolina counties.
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Record #:
5025
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In 1988, the North Carolina Department of Transportation created the Adopt-A-Highway program (AAH) to respond to public concern over highway litter. Over 6,000 groups, numbering over 150,000 volunteers, have adopted over 12,000 miles of state-maintained roadsides. In 1999, the program accounted for 7.6 million pounds of litter collected. The program saves taxpayers over $5 million annually in roadside cleanup.
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Record #:
7566
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Cape Hatteras National Seashore naturalist Clay Gifford discusses the effect of litter on wildlife. Many people who litter along the beaches or in natural areas often do not realize the harm they are creating for wildlife. Among the items Gifford considers a menace to wildlife are monofilament fishing line, plastic six-pack bottle holders, paper from Polaroid films, and cans. Birds can be ensnared, strangled, or poisoned by these items.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p36-37, il
Record #:
11125
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Dupre, North Carolina State Maintenance Engineer, discusses littering on state roadways. Since 1969, highway upkeep costs have increased $500,000 to $2.5 million. The state's 73,000-mile highway system requires about 150 crews for upkeep with a cost per crew of $16,338.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 7, July 1972, p43, 100-101, il, por
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Record #:
25027
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With an astonishing amount of recyclable materials ending up in landfills and the ocean, what other option is there for getting rid of waste? Recycling is the answer. Most things can be recycled and if recycling were to increase, the amount of waste buried would decrease dramatically.
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Record #:
25026
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There is more trash in the ocean than we know. Most of that trash is plastic. With new all-time high numbers of plastic waste in the ocean, residents and plastic companies alike are doing their part to reduce those numbers.
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Record #:
25028
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There is now a push to educate children about the problems and dangers of littering. Sixth graders even give sound advice on how to prevent and fix the littering problems currently in existence.
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Record #:
25300
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Wyatt McGhee and John Faulkner make an appeal to the people of North Carolina to support a bill that will reduce the amount of visible litter by giving a 10 cent per container deposit on beverage containers.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Spring 2007, p4, il
Record #:
26485
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Big Sweep is an annual volunteer event in North Carolina that will be held on September 21, 1991. Volunteers pick up trash at locations across the state, and help raise awareness about litter and recycling.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 5, Fall 1991, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
26494
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The first annual Kerr Lake P.U.L.L. (Pick Up Lake Litter) Fishing Tournament occurred on September 21st. Anglers fished for largemouth bass while picking up trash off the lake.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1991, p7, il
Record #:
26601
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Every year, the Beach Sweep event brings together volunteers to pick up trash along the North Carolina coast. This year cleaning efforts are part of a national movement aimed at heightening awareness of debris and its effect on marine wildlife. They will cover the beaches and more inland areas.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1988, p10-11, il
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Record #:
30725
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A 90 day campaign has begun in an attempt to clean up North Carolina's highways. Keeping North Carolina beautiful--spearheaded by the Governor's Committee for Clean Highways and based on Keep America Beautiful--has been urging community programs, tourists, and neighborhoods to pick up the litter along the state's roads.
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