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162 results for "North Carolina Naturalist"
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Record #:
20832
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coachwhip has a record length of 8 1/2 feet, with six feet being more typical. It is the state's longest snake and it is limited to Southeastern section. It feeds on small mammals, birds, lizards, and other snakes.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Sum 2013, p2-3, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20833
Abstract:
Dragonflies have worked their way into popular culture perhaps more than any other insect, having appeared on clothing, jewelry, and in works of art, including tattoos. This insect is a beneficial one that devours mosquitoes, biting flies, and other pests to humans. One aspect of their activity that citizen observers report on to scientists is swarming--either in backyards, along beaches, or on migrations. Swarming is the gaping hole in understanding dragonfly biology, and Goforth relates how citizen observations are helping scientists close that hole.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Sum 2013, p6-7, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20840
Abstract:
Bats are the only major predator of night-flying insects, and their menu of mosquitoes, gnats, and some crop pests is beneficial to humans. Over the years the bat populations have been declining, and one cause is the destruction of roosting areas. For readers living in areas where natural roosts are scarce, the authors provide information on buying bat houses or making your own.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spr/Sum 1998, p14, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20841
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will open in 1999 with ten major exhibits. In this continuing series on the exhibits, Walters takes readers behind the scenes to describe how the exhibit on prehistoric North Carolina is taking shape.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1998, p10-11, il
Record #:
20852
Author(s):
Abstract:
Willo, scientific name Thescelosaurus, is the best preserved dinosaur for its species. It has a complete skull and soft tissues which are usually lost to decay. The creature, an herbivore, was about three feet tall at the hip, weighed some six hundred pounds, and was twelve to thirteen feet long. What makes Willo unique was that its discovery revealed something that was considered undiscoverable--a fossilized organ--in this case a dinosaur heart. Friends of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences purchased Willo for $350,000, but it is estimated now to be worth ten times that because of the heart discovery.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2000, p1-8, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
20844
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clark recounts her fifteen-year period working with naturalist Paris Trail to learn more about big-eared bats and his contributions to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Trail was also a artist, wildlife photographer, and newspaper columnist for the Chowan Herald and the Roanoke Beacon. His columns on wildlife observations accumulate into a book titled From Hawks to Hummingbirds: Close Encounter with Birds of the North Carolina Coastal Plain.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p8-9, il
Record #:
20850
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old museum is right next door to the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Estimates are that it will take at least five months to move the heavy boxes of books, delicate containers of plates, and over 3,000 live animals, not to mention the offices of nearly one hundred staff people. Walters explains what it will take to move the Southeast's largest natural history museum.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p10-11, il
Record #:
20843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Kay Clark, curator of mammals at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, is the state's most active field researcher on bats. There are fifteen resident bat species in the state and about half of them live in caves or mines. The work of Clark and her assistants focuses on two rare and little-known forest-dwellers--the southeastern myotis and the big-eared bat.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p2-7, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20842
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will open soon with ten major exhibits. In this continuing series on the exhibits, Walters takes readers behind the scenes to describe how the exhibit on arthropods is taking shape.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Spr/Sum 1999, p10-11, il
Record #:
20851
Author(s):
Abstract:
This special issue of The Naturalist celebrates the opening of the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Spr/Sum 2000, p1-, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kemp examines how non-indigenous species are endangering the natives in North Carolina and beyond. For example, flathead catfish eat native fishes or their food, hydrilla plants overtake lakes, and kudzu covers every bare spot in sight. She describes characteristics of the invaders and presents seven things individuals can do to help control them.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p2-8, il, por, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
20854
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dunn explains how to garden to attract wildlife, focusing on the four things wild creatures need to survive: food, water, shelter, and a place to raise their young. His advice is to plant natives and they will come. He includes a drawing of his backyard garden which consists of native plants around a pond.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p9-12, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
20951
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, 20 miles east of Charlotte. The gold was the first native gold to be used by the U.S. Mint in Charlotte, and about $5 million in coins were struck there. In 1828, a second gold strike was made in Burke County. Gold mining became the leading industry of the state after farming. For the next fifty years, until the California Gold Rush of 1849, North Carolina led the nation in gold mining.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Sum 2004, p7-10, il, por, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
20952
Abstract:
Brent Hendrixson, a doctoral student in East Carolina's Department of Biology, was examining a series of preserved spiders within the genus Antrodiaetus, the subject of his dissertation, when he discovered a new species of trapdoor spider no one knew existed. These specimens had been collected by the USDA Forest Services in the 1970s and had been shelved at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science for the past fifteen years.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Sum 2004, p15-16, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
20953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Martin explains how digitized maps are helping scientists to research nesting habits and migrations of birds, like the tree swallow, brown pelican, and yellow-bellied sapsucker. Documentation at one time was limited to researchers, but with the coming of the Internet, such digitized maps and information are readily available to the general public and school systems for study.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Sum 2003, p2-5, il, map