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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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93 results for "NC Arts"
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Record #:
28882
Author(s):
Abstract:
Like many community theatres throughout North Carolina, most productions of the Stokes County Arts Council’s theatre group are performed in local high school auditoriums and have limited technical resources. Despite this, the technical crew finds a way to produce special effects that allow for productions to be successful.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p4-5, por
Record #:
28911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Every July the selection committee for the North Carolina Arts Council’s Community Arts Administration Intern Program interviews applicants who want to work at a local arts agency. The committee looks for applicants who can help to reshape and redesign what arts administration is in North Carolina, how it serves artists and how it relates to its community.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Winter/Spring 1994, p8
Record #:
2695
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part of the North Carolina Art Works for State Buildings Program, artist Judy Byron is creating a work using faces of North Carolinians that will hang in the new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Social Work.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall 1993, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
28903
Abstract:
This article is a chronicle of the first fifteen years of North Carolina’s Grassroots Arts program. The program brings state funds that can be used only for the arts. Overall, the program has strengthened the state arts council’s relationship with local arts agencies.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 1992, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
28928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Harrell and Beverly Patterson discuss how the land in eastern North Carolina is still crucial to our communities. Harrell aims to reconnect people with their culture or their agri-culture at the Albermarle Learning Center in Chowan County. Patterson leads a program called the Annenburg Rural Challenge to promote rural folk history and culture.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p2-3, por
Record #:
4498
Author(s):
Abstract:
Commissioned through the Artworks for State Buildings program, the sonic plaza at East Carolina University's Joyner Library is the creation of internationally known sound artist Christopher Janney. The three-hundred-foot plaza contains columns that produce sounds as people walk by and activate electronic beams; a percussive water wall; a twelve-foot swirling circle of water vapor; and a clock tower.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p8, il
Record #:
28907
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council is working with schools and community groups to connect art, science and the environment. Artists are also conducting workshops for teachers in rural areas to develop curriculum that incorporates hands-on arts and new methods of teaching.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer/Fall 1994, p1-3, por
Record #:
28883
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Goist, Chief Conservator of the North Carolina Museum of Art, explains what he and his staff do to maintain, treat and protect the museum’s collection. He also gives advice on how to care for art in private homes, emphasizing the importance of framing and lighting.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p8-9, por
Record #:
28884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversies over public art are political and involve questions about what is considered art. Debates have been raised over public sculptures in Raleigh and sign ordinances in Asheville.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p2-3, por
Record #:
4499
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte's new Mint Museum of Craft + Design, located in the 1953 Montaldo's Building, opened in January 1999. The 82,000-square-foot structure was renovated through a $9.5 million grant from Bank of America. The museum features the state's craft traditions in furniture, ceramics, textiles, and studio glass through permanent collections and galleries housing changing exhibitions.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p9, il
Record #:
28930
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School teaches the crafts, techniques, and tools that people used in western North Carolina. The school was started by Olive Dame Campbell and Marguerite Butler who believed the quality of life could be improved by education.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p6-7, por
Record #:
28880
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1971, North Carolina became the first state in the nation to establish a cabinet-level department of cultural resources. The department allocates resources to historic preservation, libraries and literary programs, exhibits of history, and artistic expression and appreciation.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Nov 1986, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
28868
Abstract:
Cultural facility development is a key issue facing arts organizations and communities across North Carolina. Seventy counties are currently in some phase of cultural facility development, but are struggling to mobilize their cultural resources for economic growth.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, July 1986, p2, il
Record #:
28919
Author(s):
Abstract:
An event called “When Visions Collide: A Seminar on Ethics as Tools for Resolving Issues in the Arts” was held in Raleigh last week. Speakers at the event discussed various ethical conflicts and dilemmas that occur in the arts.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p6
Record #:
28906
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are currently 149 community theaters in North Carolina on record with the state arts council. Presented is a distillation of interviews conducted with representatives of community theaters around the state.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 1992, p7, por