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34 results for "Greenville Times"
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Record #:
30525
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Imperial Tobacco Company building, built in the early 1900s of Dickinson Avenue, was at one time one of the Greenville tobacco markets largest buyers of tobacco for export. Abandoned by the company in 1978, the building, which covered two city blocks, was slated to be restored and renovated into a long awaited arts and community venue. In the midst of getting the beginning legal work finished, the building tragically burned down from arson. on April 17, 2008. In 2007, local artist Matthew Cook began a series of paintings using the Imperial Tobacco Company as his subject, painting views from all over town. The structure's fiery death became the subject of one last painting to end the series. The article gives a portfolio of some the paintings in the series.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p45-47
Subject(s):
Record #:
30528
Author(s):
Abstract:
C. Heber Forbes, a leading merchant in Greenville, renovated the old Anderson house on the corner of Tenth and Cotanche Streets into one of the most memorable houses in Greenville. Forbes went to St. Louis and bought the interior furnishings from a house owned by the Lambert family, makers of Listerine mouthwash. He purchased architectural details, mantels, mouldings, lighting, silk covered chairs, thick wool carpets and other French style furnishings and brought it all back to Greenville by train. The house was gutted and dissembled in 1976 and taken to Simpson, NC.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Summer 2015, p51, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30526
Author(s):
Abstract:
The following is taken from a placemat from the old Courtside Cafe showing drawings of old Greenville buildings that have been razed. The drawing and short history depicts the R. L. Smith house on Evans Street; the National Guard Armory on Evans Street; the H. G. Edwards building on Evans Street; the Sycamore Hill Baptist Church on First Street; the Pitt General Hospital on Johnston Street; and the O'Hagan-Laughinghouse house on Pitt Street.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30527
Author(s):
Abstract:
The following is taken from a placemat from the old Courtside Cafe showing drawings of old Greenville buildings that have been razed. The drawing and short history depicts the G. B. W. Hadley house on Evans Street; the Memorial Baptist Church on Greene Street; the Pitt County Jail on Third Street; the John L. Wooten House on Greene Street; the Farmers Bank on Dickinson Avenue; and the Charles S. Forbes house on Evans Street.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p46
Subject(s):
Record #:
30530
Author(s):
Abstract:
The following is taken from a placemat from the old Courtside Cafe showing drawings of old Greenville buildings that have been razed. The drawing and short history depicts the Woman's Club on Third Street; Evans Street 1914; Yellowley-Harrington house on Fourth Street; the Candlewick Inn; the Dr. Elbert A. Moye house; the old Greenville High School; and J. R. and J. G. Moye Merchandise Emporium on Evans Street.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Dec 2014/Jan 2015 , p39, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30533
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old Evans home, built 1910-11, for James Lewis Evans (1889-1970), was once located on Charles Blvd. beside the old Pitt Plaza (later Colonial Mall).
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015, p49, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30532
Author(s):
Abstract:
The following drawings by Roger Kammerer were taken from a placemat from the old Courtside Cafe showing the former Pitt County Court Houses and short history of each.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015, p48, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30536
Author(s):
Abstract:
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Winter 2015, p, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36218
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2011, Blackbeard’s flagship had artifacts such as a three footed cauldron put on display at the NC Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Understanding the true measure of the treasure, though, entailed viewing how such items, sunk in the briny deep for nearly three centuries, were conserved by the QAR Conservation Lab.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p18-28
Record #:
36221
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three generations of the Minges family and Pepsi have greatly influenced the development of Greenville in the past century. Expected, then, is how the rising generation can contribute to this city in the family owned corporation, MBG, Inc.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p42-45
Record #:
36216
Author(s):
Abstract:
A town that began as a tobacco and cotton post has grown into a top ten city in North Carolina. Profiled were employers such as Burroughs-Wellcome and East Carolina University; infrastructure challenges such as traffic congestion and urban sprawl; and advantages such as a strong industrial base and medical employment opportunities.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Dec 2014/Jan 2015 , p52-57
Record #:
36217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1980, the Marathon is largely known for its Greek dishes. However, the restaurant currently owned by Perry Kachroo has kept up with food trends of the times by including Indian items on its menu. Collectively, this explains its place as what the author described as an institution in the community.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p12-17
Record #:
36213
Author(s):
Abstract:
A building on Dickinson Avenue got a renovation in purpose and style as The Lofts. Built as a wholesale grocery store by the Hooker family in 1916, it became a loft style apartment complex in 2014. The interior and exterior photos showcase modern day conveniences coexisting with a nearly century old brick and woodwork structure.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Dec 2014/Jan 2015 , p16-23
Record #:
36219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edward Teach’s story is reflected in his dwellings and dealings in towns such as Beaufort and Bath. Blackbeard’s legend can be explained in exploits before and after his capture in 1718.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p29
Record #:
36220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ayden’s George Snyder captured French and Japanese influences in furniture and wallpaper murals. Among the descriptions of his works, capturing a broader view of history, were details of his personal history, which revealed a lifelong and intergenerational passion for art.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p30-38