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17 results for Greenville--History--Buildings
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Record #:
23383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Green built the Greene-Skinner House during 1845 - 1850. After Greene's death in 1861, David H. Dill rented the house. Robert Greene became sole owner in 1863, and later sold it to Dill's wife, Harriet L. Dill. The house was a hospital during the Civil War. When the Dills died, the house went to Harriet Dill's sister, Ann Delaney, and then to David Dill's heirs. The Dill brothers sold the property to Frank W. Brown, who mortgaged the property back to the Dills. They sold the property to Joseph G. Moye in 1898, and the Moye family sold the property in 1917 to Dr. Louis C. Skinner. Skinner and Dr. Joseph Smith opened a clinic and emergency hospital in the house. The clinic remained in the house until Dr. Smith moved it in 1946. The Skinner heirs sold the house in 1968 to the Eastern Realty Company.
Record #:
23411
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles W. Shuff moved to Greenville, N.C. in May 1922 as branch manager of the Imperial Tobacco Company. Shuff and his wife, Hattie Pitts Shuff, bought a lot on Fifth Street from J.M. and Walter L. Harrington on April 1, 1924. On this lot, they built the Shuff House, one of the largest Colonial Revival houses in Greenville, in 1925. They raised three children there, and their daughter Phyllis C. Shuff and her husband Joseph Smith, Jr. moved into the house. Christopher Woelkers purchased the Shuff house and turned it into \"The 5th Street Inn,\" Greenville's first bed & breakfast inn.
Record #:
24050
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Flanagan Buggy Company formerly occupied the corner of Fourth and Cotanche Streets in Greenville, North Carolina, a space that now houses a parking garage. The Flanagan business dates back to 1866 and has an interesting history from its establishment to the time of its closure in 1969.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015, p44-47, il, por
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Record #:
23698
Author(s):
Abstract:
Herbert Augustus White (1877-1929) was a prominent business and insurance man in Greenville. He was a local representative of the Standard Oil Company ,director of the Greenville Bank & Trust Company; vice-president of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce and first president of the Home Building & Loan Association.White was also president of the Pitt County Oil Company; first president of the Standard Realty Company; and was charter member and first chairman of the Greenville Country Club. It was said that H. A. White had the first electric lights, first indoor bathtub and first radio in Greenville. In 1903, White built a home on the corner of Fifth and Greene Streets for former Gov. T. J. Jarvis and wife to live rent free. On July 2, 1908, H. A. White and wife attended the now famous groundbreaking for the East Carolina Teachers Training School. In 1901, White built a story office building at 403 Evans Street, which would later become the office of the Home Building and Loan Association in 1906. His two-story office building is still located on Evans Street uptown and his great granddaughter owns an art shop next door.
Record #:
23710
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Greenville Bus Station sits on Fifth Street, closed, neglected and bereft. Few realize that this building is the only extant example of the late 1930’s style of architecture known as “Streamline” or “Art-Moderne” in downtown Greenville. By 1935, the Carolina Coach Company and other lines had several buses a day coming through Greenville. The bus station then was at Pleasant’s College Store, the corner of Fifth and Reade Streets. By 1940, Dr. William I. Wooten (1893-1943) proposed to build a bus station on his property at the corner of Greene and Fifth Streets. After many delays, Wooten built the bus station and it opened in April 1942. It was hoped the building would be restored back to its original glory and become a landmark among Greenville’s treasured architectural legacy.
Record #:
23000
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Jesse R. Moye house, located near the intersection of West Fifth and Pitt Streets, was one of the Greenville mansions and has an interesting history. Jesse R. Moye (1858-1935) was a successful merchant and married to Susan Novella Higgs, who at the age 12, was the youngest dancing instructor in America. Designed by Herbert Woodley Simpson of New Bern, NC, the house was built in 1902/1903 in a blend of the Queen Anne and Colonial Revival style popular at the time. Long the home of family descendants, the house was sold to a faculty member of the ECU School of Music and is now known as “The Music House.”
Record #:
23008
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article provides a short history of William H. Long's house on East Fourth Street. William H. Long (1886-1920) was a lawyer in Greenville. In 1915, his brother died in New York after having accumulated a fortune in the silent film industry. Long received a fourth share of his brother’s estate and in 1917 built his beautiful home. The house was designed by Benton and Benton of Wilson, NC in the neo-classical style. Each column is solid stone, brought up on a wagon by 24 mules from the steamboat on the river. The finished home contained 4,500 square feet of usable space, including a basement, first and second floors and a third floor that was originally planned as a ballroom. The house passed through the family and sold to a law firm. The house is now on the National Register of Historic Places.
Record #:
23028
Author(s):
Abstract:
The former home of the O'Hagan and Laughinghouse families on Pitt Street was lost in a fire on January 6, 1996. The history of the house began as a small building built in the 1850’s by Dr. Charles J. O’Hagan (1821-1900) who immigrated from Ireland in 1842. O’Hagan was a teacher in Greenville until 1846 when he went to Medical School in New York. He began practicing medicine in Greenville in 1852 and gained a State-wide reputation. The house fell to his daughter, Eliza O’Hagan, who married Joseph John Laughinghouse, a prominent farmer and politician from Grimesland. They remodeled the house into a 17 room Queen Anne Style mansion. In 1965, the Flynn Christian Fellowship Homes, Inc. bought the house to help homeless men and alcoholics. It was dedicated in February 1966.
Record #:
23041
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Greenville Municipal building and Fire Station was built on Fifth Street in 1939/40 in the Art Deco style designed by architect, Frank W. Benton and associate, George A. Snyder, of Wilson, NC. The building sits on the site of the homes of James B. Cherry and F. G. James which were razed and materials used to build the auditorium and recreational center at C. M. Eppes School. The Fire Station was completed first in October 1939. The Municipal Building was dedicated on Aug. 29, 1940.
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Record #:
22993
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Old Brick Store on Evans Street, the first brick store building in Greenville, has been hidden from the world by several renovations in its history. Built by George E. B. Singletary in 1855, the store served as Confederate quarters in the Civil War. In 1875, Samuel M. Schultz opened a grocery store there and began a 20 year stay that made the place famous. Later the building was used as dental office, newspaper office and other grocery stores. In 1913, the building became the Greenville Banking and Trust Company (later Guaranty Bank).
Record #:
22974
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Bacon Wood Hadley (1869-1933), born in La Grange, NC to Dr. Jacob Milton Hadley and Lizzie E. Kilpatrick, was educated at Davis Military Academy and was graduated from Western Maryland College. Hadley engaged in numerous business and farming activities. In 1912-1913, he built one of many fine, large homes on Evans Street. The home was demolished in 1973.
Record #:
23695
Author(s):
Abstract:
The remarkable three-story Montgomery-Ward-Belk Tyler building is located on Fifth Street and once held some of the most prestigious chain stores to ever come to Greenville. This unique building had the only polychrome terra cotta façade erected in Greenville. The first buildings on the site were livery stables owned by Glascow Evans and George King. In 1902, W. E. Hooker built a three story brick stable on the site. In 1928, Hooker tore down the stables and built the tall four-story building for the Montgomery-Ward Company. They opened on Aug. 31, 1929 with 80 clerks and 11,000 patrons. Montgomery-Ward closed in 1932 and then Quinn-Miller moved into the store building. Belk Tyler then leased the building and opened on Aug. 25, 1938 with 143 salespeople. Belk Tyler remained in this store until 1979, when it moved to Carolina East Mall. The building changed hands. In 1984, Don Edwards moved his bookstore, The Book Barn, into the building. The Book Barn closed in 1985. The building was renovated and was readapted for apartments and restaurant space. The first restaurant was Granddaddy Rosser’s; then Paul Gianino opened 5th Street Pasta Works; followed by Fillabuster’s and in 1994 by BW III’s; and in 2008 by The Armadillo Grill.
Record #:
23677
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hooker and Anthony/Diener’s Bakery Building, located at 815-1817 Dickinson Avenue was built in 1912 by Thomas Menan Hooker and P. T. Anthony, wholesale grocers, as their main office and storehouse. Thomas Menan Hooker (1875-1920) in business with William A. Teel, started the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company in Greenville in 1908. Over the years the building was home to the Hooker Wholesale Company; Railroad Express Office; NC Employment Security Commission; Peoples Bakery (Diener’s Bakery); Eastern Recording Studio; Copeland’s Cabinet Shop; and Cable and Craft Yarns. The building was bought and renovated in 2003 by Greg and Stacy Jarrell.
Record #:
23676
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hines Building, located at 901-903 Dickinson Avenue was built in 1915 by James M. Hines (1890-1927 local business man. There were businesses on the first floor and apartments and dance hall on the second floor. Hines came to Greenville in 1911 and was involved in numerous businesses such as sawmills, bottling business, automobile and garage business, poultry farm and dairy. The Hines Building was once home to the Coca Cola Bottling Works; a bank; Order of Red Men Lodge; The Strand Theatre; The Busy Bee Café; Pitt FCX Service; The Friendly Furniture; Ken’ Furniture; and Bill McDonald’s Karate School.``
Record #:
22801
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located on the southwest corner of Third and Evans streets, the Rialto Block was built in 1896 by Joseph P. Elliot & Brother of Baltimore, MD. The block contained numerous stores which burned in 1897 and was rebuilt. The corner building of the Rialto was home to The Daily Reflector from 1901 until 1956. It later became Biggs Drug Store, then Hargett’s Drug Store, and after a number of businesses, reopened as Courtside Café. In 1896, Joseph P. Elliot and his brother built the Rialto, located on the southwest corner of Third and Evans Streets, to provide a brick block for all the Elliot brothers' many stores. One section housed The Daily Reflector offices from January 1901 until 1956. The Daily Reflector's move in 1957 reduced the building to one-story and it is now a cafe.