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18 results for Greenville--History
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Record #:
23369
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The Ficklen family of Greenville traces back to James Ficklen of Virginia, a merchant, legislator, and commissioner to the Paris Exposition. Ficklen and his wife had nine children, several of which were noted citizens of Greenville. They individually and collectively have been involved with the East Carolina Teachers Training School, real estate and insurance businesses, cotton, tobacco, and the development of Greenville as a city. James Skinner Ficklen was a close friend of the college, for which the James Skinner Ficklen Memorial Stadium was dedicated.
Record #:
23425
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On April 12, 1845, the shortest man in history, Tom Thumb, came to Tarboro, where he was shown at the Pender Hotel. He was twenty - seven inches high and weighed twenty - five pounds. He made his living by selling photographs of himself. According to an advertisement that appeared in a Tarboro newspaper, Tom Thumb was scheduled to appear in Greenville and Washington after his visit there.\r\n\r\nOn July 31, 1969, Fidel Castro's sister, Juanita, gave two talks at East Carolina University. She denounced her brother's rule and stated that she was helping Cuban refugees flee his regime. Her speeches reflected strong anti - Communist sentiment. She believed that ninety - five percent of Cubans were unhappy with Fidel Castro and that one day Cuba would become free again.\r\n
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Record #:
23512
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Articles published in 1974 in The Daily Reflector provide Phil Carroll's, a local developer, and the late Leo Jenkins's, former chancellor of East Carolina University, visions for Greenville's growth of Greenville in 2000. Carroll envisioned a population of 80,000 to 100,000 and the formation and of medical and educational institutions, causing \"excellent growth in this area.\" Former Chancellor Jenkins believed that East Carolina would have a larger adult enrollment than college-age enrollment and that university professors would function more like counselors than instructors. Jenkins predicted that there would be no cars on the campus and that soccer would be the most popular sport.
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Record #:
22826
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The following was taken from an article written Kate W. Lewis, a faculty member at East Carolina Teachers Training School, capturing the essence of Greenville during the period 1900-1919. She talks about Fifth Street, the Model School, Buzzard’s Roost, College View, Yellowley’s house, Sam White’s Field, Greenville High School, and ECTTS.
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Record #:
22827
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More unusual stories from Pitt County’s past include home seekers from Ohio visiting Greenville in 1921 who get accidently locked in the Pitt County Jail. In 1912, the children of T. G. Manning were playing with dynamite caps which nearly blew up the kitchen and T. G. Manning nearly lost his left hand. In 1920, Greenville ordinances stated every vehicle had to stop five minutes when the fire alarm sounded or until the fire truck had passed. Also, that all vehicles had to be off the streets from 1:00-6:00 am so that the streets could be cleaned. In 1931, the businessmen of Greenville formed a volleyball team. They played on Tuesday and Friday afternoons. In 1920, Miss Maude Blow Fulford had a terrible fall while sleepwalking. And lastly, Fanny May Bowen and Guy Moore had numerous love trials. They eloped several times, but were caught each time. The Bowen family disowned her and she married Moore and lived near Ormondsville, NC with his people.
Subject(s):
Record #:
23703
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Annie Oakley, the American legend, international star and sure-shot, came through Greenville on Sept. 17, 1913, nearly one month before she retired. Between 1911 and 1913, Annie Oakley appeared in Vernon C. Seavers’ “Young Buffalo Wild West Show.” This Young Buffalo Wild West Show and Col. Cummins “Far East Show” appeared together in Greenville and put on a spectacle never before seen in Greenville. These united shows came to Greenville in 40 train cars and set up a huge hippodrome tent with a seating capacity of 10,000 people. A street parade, over a mile in length, left the show grounds near the depot and wound its way through downtown Greenville. Made up of hundreds of cowboys, cowgirls, scouts plainsmen, vaqueros and the Far East contingent made up of Russian Cossacks, Cingalese, Arabs, Moaria, Hindus, Japanese and other Orientals in their marvelous costumes wowed the crowds.
Record #:
23718
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Being from eastern North Carolina you can always recall the sweltering heat and humidity of your youth. There was no air conditioning to give us relief. Those hot nights when there wasn’t a breathe of air, only small electric fans, and the chorus of every dog in town barking kept weary citizens up all night. In 1935, the Pitt Theatre began to have cooled air. In 1943, Olde Towne Inn advertised they were the only air-conditioned restaurant in town. There were hot days working in tobacco and hot churches where the congregation would “endure a little heat for the Lord.” Advertising fans from stores, tobacco companies and funeral homes always provided a little relief. In 1981, Ida Wooten Tripp, a local writer, wrote a wonderful story in the local newspaper about remembering a particular hot day in Pitt County in her youth.
Record #:
23713
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Kammerer recalls numerous people and places around Greenville. The article includes Dr. Melvin P. Hoot; “The Goat Man,” Riggs House Restaurant; the Jet Plane in Elm St. Park; Boys Rifle Club; Joe Pecheles Motors Volkswagen; Char-Steak House; Stratford Arms Apartments; The Greenville Boys Club, Tar River Swim Club; Tippy’s Taco House; and Wilbur Hardee’s numerous restaurants.
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Record #:
22981
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The author gives five interesting stories from Pitt County’s past. Back in 1966, slot racing was a big thing and enthusiasts would go to Howard Bodkin’s Music Store to race on his 112 ft. track in a back room. In December 1967, the singer, Ray Charles, was the first concert artist to appear in ECU’s new 7,000 seat Minges Coliseum. Tickets were $3.00 each to the general public and 50 cents for faculty and students. The third story gives interesting details about Alex Ogman, a former slave, who in 1940 had had nineteen wives and 40 children. The next story from 1789 describes a counterfeiter's gruesome punishment. And lastly there was an account concerning lost dynamite located under ECU’s YWCA Hut building, behind the Infirmary.
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Record #:
22925
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A visiting minister, Josephus Daniels, attending a Methodist conference in Greenville in 1931 describes Greenville at the time of his visit. He compares his diary account with George Washington’s diary account of his visit to Greenville.
Subject(s):
Record #:
23506
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Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Smith share their memories of Greenville in 1900, with a population of about 1,500, a few stores, and many surrounding farms. Mr. Smith moved to Greenville in 1883 from below Ayden and formed the Pitt County Buggy Company and later the Greenville Buggy Company. Smith retired as head mechanic at Flanagan Buggy Company after 51 years. Smith never believed that he would see paved streets or automobiles in Greenville, but he lived to see both. He said he “wasn’t much on airplanes.”
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Record #:
23500
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Mrs. Peyton Atkinson of Greenville wrote a letter to Governor Zebulon Vance describing the terror endured by the citizens of Greenville during a \"Yankee\" raid on the city. Mrs. Atkinson states that General Martin ordered Confederate troops to leave Greenville only a short time before the raid and expresses her dislike for this action telling Vance citizens would have been spared if General Martin had ordered his troops to protect the town of Greenville. She calls for an investigation into this matter. In addition, Mrs. Laura Dudley Griffin, widow of Confederate veteran Robert L. Griffin (d. 1915) tells of growing up in a house that sat on the line between Pitt and Craven Counties.
Source:
Record #:
23475
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The following was taken from a feature article from 1959 about Mrs. Lula Fleming (1878-1967) was the daughter of Capt. Charles A. White and Louisa Amanda Corey, and the widow of James Lawson Fleming (1867-1909) former legislator who helped push the bill to establish what is now East Carolina University. Mrs. Fleming was an organist and was a member of numerous civic and historical organizations. She recalled the first one-room school house she went to on the corner of Washington and Fourth Streets, which later became the first telephone office. She spoke of the steamboats, dances and parties. She said…”in my youth no young people would think of going out unchaperoned. Such a thing as a night ride could have ostracized you.”
Subject(s):
Record #:
23681
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The author recalls visits to Greenville by famous people such as Edward R. Murrow, who visited several times. In March 1968, Barry Goldwater, Republican presidential candidate, spoke at ECU. Other politicians to visit were: Mrs. Jimmy Carter, Nancy Reagan and George Wallace in 1976. Some of the sports greats that have come through Greenville were: Brian Piccolo, Terry Bradshaw, Mercury Morris and Artis Gilmole. Mark Spitz was here several times during swimming competitions and while here in 1968, ECU Swim coach, Ray Scharf, recognized Spitz as a potential super athlete. Scharf tried to recruit Spitz for the ECU Swim Team, but Spitz went to Indiana University instead. Spitz went to the Mexico Olympic Games and did poorly. He went on to the 1972 Munich Olympic Games and came away with seven Gold Medals and world records.
Record #:
22816
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Kammerer gives a detailed account of Presidential nominee John F. Kennedy’s visit to Greenville on September 17, 1960. Three planes flew into the Greenville airport. the first two carried the senators staff and Washington newsmen. The third plane held Kennedy and his aides. He stayed only 87 minutes but spoke to a crowd of 20,000 at the stadium. Accompanied by Gov. Terry Sanford and his motorcade, he also visited a tobacco warehouse and gave his speech at the College Stadium.