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5 results for Oakley, Annie, 1860-1926
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Record #:
8906
Abstract:
Between 1916 and 1926, the Pinehurst community experienced a boom period. Not all booms were economic. Some came from the end of Annie Oakley's gun when she gave marksmanship demonstrations. Oakley also taught women the art of shooting. Her demonstrations often included shooting holes in pennies that were thrown into the air, shooting off the ashes from her husband's cigarettes, and shooting six glass balls thrown into the air before any could hit the ground. Oakley usually completed her performance while never looking directly at the targets.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p60-61, por
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Record #:
10746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Annie Oakley retired to North Carolina in 1911. She married Frank Butler while working for Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Together, the couple toured America and Europe in the late 1800s. During World War I, Oakley toured North Carolina, gave free shows for the military and raised funds for the Red Cross.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 16, Jan 1967, p13-14, por
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Record #:
16104
Author(s):
Abstract:
Annie Oakley, famous performer in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, retired to North Carolina after 1915. She and her husband Frank worked at the Carolina Hotel in Pinehurst, where she demonstrated and taught her marksmanship skills.
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Record #:
9712
Author(s):
Abstract:
After she retired from Buffalo Bill's “Wild West Show,” the legendary Annie Oakley was a shooting instructor at the Pinehurst Resort from 1915 until 1922. Among her students were the composer John Philip Sousa and John D. Rockefeller.
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Record #:
23703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Annie Oakley, the American legend, international star and sure-shot, came through Greenville on Sept. 17, 1913, nearly one month before she retired. Between 1911 and 1913, Annie Oakley appeared in Vernon C. Seavers’ “Young Buffalo Wild West Show.” This Young Buffalo Wild West Show and Col. Cummins “Far East Show” appeared together in Greenville and put on a spectacle never before seen in Greenville. These united shows came to Greenville in 40 train cars and set up a huge hippodrome tent with a seating capacity of 10,000 people. A street parade, over a mile in length, left the show grounds near the depot and wound its way through downtown Greenville. Made up of hundreds of cowboys, cowgirls, scouts plainsmen, vaqueros and the Far East contingent made up of Russian Cossacks, Cingalese, Arabs, Moaria, Hindus, Japanese and other Orientals in their marvelous costumes wowed the crowds.