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8 results for Women--History
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Record #:
154
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The booklet entitled NORTH CAROLINA WOMEN: RECLAIMING THEIR PLACE IN HISTORY throws light on the accomplishments of North Carolina women, from Virginia Dare to Elizabeth Dole.
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Record #:
14913
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Abstract:
Throughout Antebellum South women were charged with household duties and were not expected to seek jobs. Two common positions for women included teaching and journalism but some women broke gender employment boundaries. Within the historical account, women owned small business from retail to inns and taverns. Mary McKechen, of Tennessee produced and sold gunpowder.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 23, Nov 1943, p25-26, 28, il
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Record #:
15864
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Use of informal, sometimes grammatically incorrect language, to write her book Mama Learned Us to Work: Farm Women in the New South, Dr. Lu Ann Jones conjures up a gritty account of real women in early20th-century North Carolina. Using of oral history, Dr. Jones explores the variety of work and various roles women filled during this period.
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Record #:
16840
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of History and Division of Archives and History staff began planning an exhibit in 1984 to highlight the history of North Carolina women. This exhibit, titled \"The Task That Is Ours,\" would cover the topic for the last 400 years and be the hallmark of the North Carolina Museum of History's new building. Only one previous exhibit promoted the history of one woman, Georgia Thompson Broadwick, a female parachutist in the early 20th-century.
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Record #:
24458
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Abstract:
The author presents women from North Carolina during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and how they participated in protecting their state and property. For example, some women spied on British troops for American soldiers during the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p12-13, por
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Record #:
22461
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Grace Greenlee was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia around 1750. With her newly wed husband Captain John Bowan and other family members, she became one of the early settlers of what is now Burke County North Carolina at the beginning of the Revolution. Numerous stories surround her experiences during the Revolutionary War, including the death of her husband, escapes from Tories, and her eventual marriage to war hero General Charles McDowell.
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Record #:
22452
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According to Seawell Jones, Esther Wake was supposedly a sister-in-law to Governor Tryon for whom Wake County was named. She is also said to have influenced the decision to build a Governor's Palace in New Bern in 1766. More modern historians have disputed her existence. However, letters of several contemporaries provide firm evidence of her influence on colonial affairs.
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Record #:
31214
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Abstract:
In the 1920s, peddlers and rolling stores brought household goods to the parlors and porches of rural women in eastern North Carolina. Itinerant merchants were alternatives for women who felt uncomfortable in country stores, or were unable to visit stores due to practical constraints. A third kind of itinerant merchant were agents who represented large enterprises such as the W.T. Rawleigh Company and the J.R. Watkins Medical Company.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p32-34, por Periodical Website