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13 results for Women in war
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Record #:
5956
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The Jackson Library at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro houses the Women Veterans Historical Collection. It is the only collection of its kind nationally and \"celebrates the considerable contribution women veterans have made in all branches of military service.\"
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Record #:
9209
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In 1929, Greensboro native Mary Webb Nicholson became the first licensed female pilot in North Carolina. She learned to fly at Raven Rock Flying School in Portsmouth, Ohio. Nicholson flew with the British Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II and was killed in 1943, when the engine on her plane failed. Too low to the ground to parachute, she died trying to land the plane.
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Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 55 Issue 3, July 2007, p109-115, il, por, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
9370
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Malinda Blalock, under the pseudonym “Sam Blalock,” joined the Twenty Sixth North Carolina Regiment of the Confederate army commanded by Zebulon B. Vance in order to be near her husband, L. M., or Keith. Both eventually left the Confederates and served as Yankee spies for a Michigan Regiment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 6, Nov 1974, p21-22, 28, il
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Record #:
10013
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This is the first in a series of articles about women who have played dramatic and interesting roles in the history of North Carolina. The author describes an incident in the Revolutionary War when Gen. Nathanial Greene, weary, despondent, and lacking money for his troops, arrives at the Salisbury inn of Mrs. Elizabeth Maxwell Steele. Mrs. Steele, an ardent patriot, gave the general two bags of gold and silver, her entire life savings, so that he and his men could continue the fight for independence.
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Record #:
10076
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A gravestone commemorating Aunt Abby House was erected deep in the woods of Franklin County where a crude wooden marker once stood. The inscription reads: “Aunt Abby House, Angel of Mercy to the Confederate Soldiers, Died April 30, 1881.” The stone was fashioned after those placed on Confederate soldiers' graves by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p17, 23, por
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Record #:
16191
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During World War I, North Carolinians, including women and children, supported the war effort stateside. Canning clubs were organized to preserve food. The Woodcraft Girls sold food pledge cards and the Campfire Girls volunteered to babysit the children of women who worked or volunteered in plants or at the Red Cross.
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Record #:
19205
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Women played an important part in the Revolutionary War. Abernethy recounts a few outstanding incidents, including Susan Twitty, Mary Slocumb, and Elizabeth Steele.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 31, Jan 1944, p3-4, il
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Record #:
24458
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The author presents women from North Carolina during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and how they participated in protecting their state and property. For example, some women spied on British troops for American soldiers during the Revolutionary War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p12-13, por
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Record #:
16157
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Women were banned from the military until President Roosevelt approved the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps bill on May 15, 1942. Westray Battle Boyce, an enlistee from Rocky Mount, became the corps First Office Candidate Class at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. She served her country in Africa and tirelessly promoted the role of women in the armed forces.
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Record #:
16189
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Women served both the loyalists and the patriots during the American Revolution. Some of the famous women on the Loyalists side were native-Scotswoman Flora McDonald and Elizabeth Cornell Bayard. Margaret Sharpe, Betsy Dowdy, Mary Slocumb, and Elizabeth Maxwell Steele served the Patriots during the Revolution.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p13-17, il
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Record #:
4882
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Besides running businesses and farms while their men were in service during the Civil War, woman contributed to the cause in a number of other ways. They made uniforms, socks, tents, and leather goods. They also made company flags for the men from their hometowns. As the war progressed and materials were in short supply, women had to relearn old skills such as cloth weaving.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p13-14, il
Record #:
29028
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Raleigh Little Theatre is presenting a series of three plays called “Women and War”. The plays are about the experiences of women on the home front, women in the field, and one woman placed by technology in both at once. Taken together, these three works are meant to challenge our ideas about where combat takes place and where it ends.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 16, May 2017, p22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34545
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Flora McDonald was a Scottish born immigrant who came to Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1774. Prior to her emigration, McDonald assisted Bonnie Prince Charlie in escaping Scotland following the Battle of Culloden. Upon arrival three decades later in North Carolina, McDonald was greeted with enthusiasm from North Carolina’s Scottish population for her help. McDonald provided further support for the Loyalists during the American Revolution. After her husband was captured, McDonald returned to Scotland.
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