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13 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Women
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Record #:
2221
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Abstract:
Franklin County's Abby House, known as Aunt Abby, was defined by a fierce loyalty to the Confederacy during the Civil War and a cantankerous resolve to aid her friends and her kin. Her epitaph reads, \"Angel of Mercy to Confederate Soldiers.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 11, Apr 1995, p13-14, por
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Record #:
8540
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Abstract:
Thousands of women on the home front during the Civil War rendered valuable services to the soldiers who were away at the front. Many of the men were their husbands, fathers, brothers, sons, and neighbors. The Wilmington Soldiers' Aid Society organized in August 1861 to provide assistance to the soldiers. Hertzler describes the society, which worked long hours to provide provisions, money, and support. The work of Mrs. Alfred Martin is discussed.
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Record #:
15475
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Mrs. Lucy Mathilda Kenny, native North Carolinian, is said to be the only Confederate woman who fought through the American Civil War. She cut off her hair, took her squirrel rifle, and performed a valiant service to the Confederate Army. She died at the age of 112 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 52, May 1937, p20
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Record #:
15674
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In the last of Gerard's his eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes devastation is synonymous with the Civil War and affected not only beleaguered troops from both sides but a large population left behind; women. With men off fighting the war, women were left behind to cope with everyday life, but this everyday existence differed between dissimilar socio-economic groups. Those who enjoyed a privileged life before conflict continued to live with some degree of comfort and when war threatened too close, these women could pick-up and move away. Middle-class and lower-class women experienced greater degrees of hardship and much sooner into the conflict. Yet no segment of the female population suffered more than African-Americans, abandoned by husbands or abused by Confederate and Union troops alike.
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Record #:
16938
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This piece chronicles the lives of the Devereux sisters, a group of southern women living around the time of the Civil War. These six sisters (Kate Devereux Edmondston, Frances Devereux Miller, Elizabeth Devereux Jones, Mary Bayard Devereux Clarke, Nora Devereux Cannon, and Sophia Devereux Turner) from Halifax County represent the changing image and expectation of southern women, especially those in the upper class. These women out of necessity and will became more independent and defiant of their traditional roles; for example, Mary Bayard followed her husband into battle.
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Record #:
20962
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Joseph Mumford Foy owned a 2,025 acre estate on the island of Poplar Grove, 15 miles northeast of Wilmington. After the death of her husband, Mary Ann Foy was left to manage the estate, which remained untouched throughout the duration of the Civil War. The article includes a detailed description of the estate, the Foys' progressive opinions concerning Southern secession and slavery, and the state's legislation concerning slaves and ownership.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p209-217, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21537
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This article compares letters and diaries of four wealthy women of elite society in Caldwell County, Ella Harper, Till Abernathy, Laura Norwood, and Mary Fries Patterson, to determine how the combination of a common geographical location mostly spared of direct contact with military invasion and civil unrest, wealth, and a support network based on prewar affiliations among females of their social class enabled these women to cope more effectively with wartime hardships than other women of the Piedmont and mountains of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21557
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The western part of North Carolina did not suffer any major military campaigns during the Civil War, though women faced many other difficulties including physical threats, attacks, social, economic, and political splintering of their communities, and the presence of Confederate deserters and Union sympathizers. Communities in the region strained under the pressure of the Confederate war machine, but women in western North Carolina fought to maintain their traditional lifestyle, undermining the Confederate struggle in the process.
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Record #:
24608
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As part nine of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the role of nine nuns who traveled from New York to nurse soldiers back to health in Beaufort, North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p218-220, 222-226, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4882
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Besides running businesses and farms while their men were in service during the Civil War, woman contributed to the cause in a number of other ways. They made uniforms, socks, tents, and leather goods. They also made company flags for the men from their hometowns. As the war progressed and materials were in short supply, women had to relearn old skills such as cloth weaving.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p13-14, il
Record #:
28620
Abstract:
Mary Ann Buie (Miss Buie) was a writer known for her controversial articles published in the Wilmington Daily Journal from 1861-1865. Early in the Civil War, Miss Buie left journalism to specialize in solicitations for the welfare of the soldiers. It was her dedication to this cause that made her a celebrity.
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Record #:
34566
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Emeline Pigott was born and raised in Carteret County just outside Morehead City. Living near a Confederate encampment during her early twenties, Pigott served as a nurse and gathered information on Union movement for the Confederacy. Captured and imprisoned in 1864, Pigott was eventually released and moved to Morehead City following the Civil War. She became one of the founding members of the North Carolina chapter of Daughters of the Confederacy, established 1906.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Summer 1995, p3-4, il, por
Record #:
34625
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an 1865 poem written by Narcissa Davis. Davis worked as a Confederate nurse in Goldsboro and an activist for the war cause. The poem addresses the tragedy and sacrifice of the American Civil War.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p37