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10 results for Wetlands--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
223
Author(s):
Abstract:
This entire issue is devoted to defining what constitutes a wetland and to discussing their peril in the face of increasing encroachment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p2-5, il Periodical Website
Record #:
224
Abstract:
Protecting wetlands in North Carolina is especially difficult because different sets of rules govern different types of wetlands.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p6-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3261
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1996 General Assembly enacted the Wetlands Restoration Program that allocates $9.2 million to begin improving the quantity, quality, and vital function of the state's wetlands.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p19-26, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
5177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Up until the 1950s, the government's attitude toward wetlands was to drain them. By the 1980s large areas of wetlands were gone. In the 1990s, wetlands were recognized for their valuable environmental functions, and now the government's focus is on preservation and restoration. Whisnant defines wetlands and discusses what federal and state laws govern them.
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Record #:
26452
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than half of North Carolina’s wetlands now under Federal regulation would be removed from the reach of the law, if rules proposed in August 1991 by the Bush-Quayle administration are adopted. The proposed rules revise the definition of a wetland in attempt to prevent unnecessary inference with private property rights.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 40(1), Jan/Feb 1992, p3-4, il
Record #:
741
Author(s):
Abstract:
Our wetlands are disappearing rapidly, but new programs such as the \"swampbuster\" provision of the 1985 Farm Bill and the National Wetlands Inventory are expected to help.
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Record #:
34204
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission in October upheld a Division of Environmental Management decision to deny water quality certification for a permit to fill a two-acre freshwater wetland in Pender County. This action signaled the commission’s intention to protect the water quality functions of the state’s remaining wetlands.
Record #:
34217
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Management’s (DEM) Water Quality Committee proposes wetlands classifications and standards that establish best uses of wetlands, criteria for deciding which specific activities will be permitted in wetlands, and the level of mitigation to be required when activities are permitted. This article discusses the proposed standards and reasons for the proposal.
Record #:
34330
Author(s):
Abstract:
In June, the National Research Council said that the Clean Water Act Section 404 program that allows developers to fill in wetlands in exchange for restoring or creating others is not meeting the goal of “no net loss” in function of wetlands. The Council made recommendations to improve the Section 404 compensatory mitigation program. In North Carolina, the Wetlands Restoration Program is doing a watershed assessment to determine where it would be most beneficial to do mitigation as suggested by the Council.
Record #:
34345
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) alters more wetlands and riparian areas and undertakes more compensatory mitigation than any other single entity in the state. In March 2002, the second of two reports on evaluation of mitigation sites and the mitigation program was published. The East Carolina University researchers who conducted the evaluation discussed significant weaknesses in NCDOT’s mitigation program and offered recommendations for restoration and improvement.