NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Waynesville--Description and travel
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waynesville, county seat of Haywood County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. It is the largest town in the county and was named for Revolutionary War General “Mad Anthony” Wayne. There is no shortage of things to do and see there. The town offers a diverse arts and culture scene. The downtown area is quaint, charming, and reminiscent of bygone days. Its eclectic mix of retailers and places to visit include the Mast General Store and the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
17589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waynesville, county seat of Haywood County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the places not to miss seeing there are Main Street, the Sweet Onion, Frogs Leap Public House, Waynesville Historic Farmers Market, the Yellow House Bed and Breakfast, and elk viewing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22447
Abstract:
Waynesville, located in Haywood County, is town \"with an enduring charm that offers a little something for everybody.\" Among the things to see and do are the Burr Studio and Gallery, Grace Cathey's Sculpture Garden and Metal Art Gallery, the Kitchen Shop, Towne Square, and Whitman's Bakery and Sandwich Shop.
Source:
Record #:
23795
Abstract:
Waynesville in Haywood County, North Carolina enjoys a growing reputation as a mountain tourist destination.
Source:
Record #:
24077
Abstract:
The Waynesville Strand first opened in 1947 as the second theatre on Main Street. In 1993, a fire caused damage that was too expensive for the owner to fix and it lay vacant for twenty years until some locals bought it and began to refurbish the historical icon.
Record #:
24658
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the far west region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Waynesville, Cherokee, Murphy, and Hayesville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p26-32, 55, il
Full Text:
Record #:
34276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Haywood County town of Waynesville is known as the “gateway to the Smokies”. In the 1800s, tourists came for the purported health benefits of the clean mountains. Today, they also come for the downtown art galleries, craft breweries, and local restaurants.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text: