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6 results for Transportation planning
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Record #:
15901
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Richmond argues that questions of social values and goals should be taken into account, as well as technological solutions, when exploring means of planning.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Fall 1987, p42-53, bibl, f
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Record #:
24793
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Journalist Edward Martin describes the plans for North Carolina roads and public transit systems during the next decade. He emphasizes that many lawmakers are concerned a decade will not improve the heavy traffic problems if the government does not begin to look for funds outside of the taxpayers’ pocket.
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27443
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The Wake County transit plan, which has its primary funding source on the November 8 ballot, promises to bring long-needed upgrades to the current bus system. However, some are wondering what improved transit could mean for Raleigh’s burgeoning gentrification problem.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p10 Periodical Website
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Record #:
27685
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In this Transportation and Logistics Round Table, transportation experts gathered to discuss the industry’s successes and challenges in North Carolina.
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Record #:
28953
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The Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit project remains questionable due to funding. Under the current light-rail proposal, the federal government would be responsible for half of the project’s funding. U.S. Representative G.K. Butterfield is optimistic that the project will progress.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Feb 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31984
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The late Dr. Henry Jordan, Cedar Falls dentist turned industrial who served as Governor Kerr Scott’s State Highway chairman, predicted that interstate highways would lead to the end of the automobile age. As the costs of owning and operating an automobile increase, and traffic and parking problems persist in Raleigh, Jordan’s prediction seems to be coming true. This article discusses transportation planning in North Carolina.
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