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8 results for Thalian Hall (Wilmington)
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Record #:
3181
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Thalian Hall in Wilmington is often called the city's crown jewel. Built in 1855, it is the last surviving theater of 19th-century American theater architect John Montague. The theater is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Record #:
8811
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Thalian Hall was built in 1855 and has served as Wilmington's center for theatre arts. After its opening, the theatre became a major success and continued its role during the Civil War hosting many performances for Confederate Soldiers. During Reconstruction, Thalian Hall suffered financial difficulties, though it later recovered. Famous actors including Oscar Wilde, Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell made appearances in the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries. Thalian Hall fell into disrepair during the 1940s and 1950s, but since 1973 a major renovation effort has taken place. The theatre retains much of its original architectural design and was used as a reference for the recent renovation of Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p18-20, por
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Record #:
8857
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In 1854, Wilmington's town commissioners contracted for a new theater as well as a new city hall. The result was Thalian Hall, which opened in 1858 and could seat 1,000 people. The list of performers from that date down to the present reads like a who's who of national and international entertainers. Tony Rivenbark, who became the theater's executive director in 1979, has been associated with the theater over forty years--as a student at Wilmington College (now UNCW), as a performer in over seventy-five plays, and as a chronicler and preserver of the theater's history. Thalian Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p86-88, 90, 92-93, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20474
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This article is the second in a series of articles looking at the professional theater in Wilmington from 1858-1930. This installment focuses on the years between 1870 and 1900, and includes a detailed account of plays, orchestras, operas, traveling shows and theater companies that were engaged at Thalian Hall (known alternately as the Wilmington Theater) as well as accounts of complete theatrical seasons by year. Particular attention is given to famous actors of the period who appeared in Wilmington including Edwin Forrest, Fanny Janauschek, Edward A. Sothern, and Joseph Jefferson.
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Record #:
20495
Author(s):
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This article is the third and last in a series of articles looking at the professional theater in Wilmington from 1858-1930. This installment focuses on the years between 1900 and 1930, and includes a detailed account of plays, orchestras, operas, traveling shows and theater companies that were engaged at Thalian Hall (known alternately as the Wilmington Theater) as well as accounts of complete theatrical seasons by year. Particular attention is given to famous actors of the period who appeared in Wilmington including James O'Neill, Otis Skinner, Lillian Russell, John Griffith, Maude Adams, and Harry Lauder among others.
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Record #:
28656
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Wilmington’s City Hall opened in 1859, and featured a theater financed by the town commissioners and the Thalian Association. Known as Thalian Hall, the theater became an integral part of Wilmington life. Besides providing entertainment, it was a place of assembly for a variety of occasions.
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Record #:
28298
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Designed by Mr. Trimble of New York, Thalian Hall held its grand opening in Wilmington on the night of October 12, 1858. There were elaborate decorations of fluted columns and bright colors alongside a complex system of trapdoors on-stage to assist in setting the scene. Broadfoot documents the early acting seasons that began once Thalian Hall opened, in addition to describing the role of the theatre in public life for Wilmington residents during the Civil War.
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Record #:
35820
Abstract:
The guide featured ten towns, spanning Coast to Mountains. Profiles highlighted what made each town unique. Sup worthy restaurants included Durham’s Bullock’s Barbeque, Greensboro’s the Hungry Fisherman, and The Blue Stove in Pinehurst—Southern Pines. Historical sites included the old Market House in Fayetteville, Wilmington’s Thalian Hall, Raleigh’s Oakwood section, and Bethabara in Winston-Salem. Entertainment hubs included the Charlotte Motor Speedway, High Point’s North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, and Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p19-21, 23-24, 26, 28-34, 36-41